Get the State Wildflower Plate to support the natural world

Everyone loves a field of flowers … especially the bees and butterflies that depend on them. But our flowers are vanishing from our rapidly developing landscape, and just when wildlife needs them the most.

Show your support our natural world by purchasing the State Wildflower specialty license plate! Since 2000, the plate has raised almost $4 million for roadside wildflowers, gardens in public parks and schools, educational materials and more.

Purchase your plate today over the phone or at your county tax collector’s office.

Quick facts

  • The State Wildflower license plate costs $15 more than a regular Florida plate. The $15 contribution funds wildflower work throughout the state.
  • Plate owners are Florida Wildflower Foundation members and receive member benefits. Register your membership here.
  • Don’t wait — you can purchase a State Wildflower plate even if your present plate hasn’t expired!
  • The plate features a montage of Florida’s state wildflower, the Coreopsis. There are 17 species found in Florida, 14 of which are native.

State Wildflower Tag Q & A

Question: What does the tag cost?

In addition to the $15 fee given to the Florida Wildflower Foundation, the state charges a $28 new plate fee when a motorist switches to a new plate, in addition to a $5 Specialty License Plate Processing Fee. Counties may levy additional small charges. When renewing your State Wildflower license plate, you’ll pay the $15 fee given to FWF, plus the $5 processing fee.

Why is an extra $15 charged?

The State Wildflower license tag is the Florida Wildflower Foundation’s main source of funding. When you purchase or renew the tag, your tax-deductible donation of $15 goes to the Foundation and is used solely to protect and plant native wildflowers and plants in Florida. We can’t do this work without your support.

What does the Foundation do with my donation?

The Foundation uses the donation to fund native Florida wildflower research, education and planting/conservation projects. Your donation also includes a Florida Wildflower Foundation membership.

What if I want my State Wildflower license tag now but my present tag hasn't expired?

You can purchase a State Wildflower tag at any time. Simply fill out our form to purchase your plate by phone, or visit your county tax collector’s office. However, you will pay an additional fee to switch plates.

I went to my tag office, but I did not see the State Wildflower tag on the wall or in the license plate samples book.

Florida has more than 120 specialty license plates, so it can be difficult to find the State Wildflower tag among them. Just tell the clerk you want flower power – the State Wildflower license tag!

I have a personalized “vanity” tag. Can I still get the State Wildflower license plate?

Yes. The State Wildflower tag’s center-logo design can accommodate up to seven letters and a space or hyphen. Learn more about personalized tags.

Where can I learn more about switching to the State Wildflower license plate?

Go to the Florida Department of Motor Vehicle’s web site, or call your local tax collector’s office.

What is the "state wildflower" shown on the tag?

Artist Bill Celander of Tallahassee artistically enhanced the flower to make it more vivid and visible. It depicts the genus Coreopsis. There are 16 Coreopsis species in the state.

Membership matters

Join today to save wild Florida

Our members have raised more than $4 million to spread flowers along roadsides, research their mysteries, and teach people how Florida’s first flowers sustain bees and butterflies. Join them today in supporting native wildflowers and the wildlife depending on them.

Join online or print an application to send via mail.

Do you have a Florida State Wildflower license plate? Your membership is free!

Members receive:

  • Free e-newsletter
  • Action alerts
  • Free packet of Florida native wildflower seeds
  • Discounts on FWF events and field trips
  • Copy of Real Florida Gardener magazine*

*Upon request; while supplies last.

State Wildflower License Plate Membership

Membership is included with purchase of the wildflower plate

Your donation supports wildflowers, wildlife and wild places

Wildflower Champions

Brightman and Nan Logan

A fifth-generation Floridian, Brightman Logan grew up roaming West Central Florida’s woods and wetlands. Now, much of the land he remembers – along with its creatures – is gone. He finds that troubling. “To me, there’s an urgency about preserving our habitats,” he says. “We’re losing so much of it so quickly.”

Through their longtime support of the Florida Wildflower Foundation, Brightman and his wife, Nan, are helping to reverse habitat loss and bring native wildflowers and plants to urban places.

Brightman and Nan Logan help protect and restore natural Florida through generous support for the Florida Wildflower Foundation.

“When I look at the Foundation’s accomplishments, I see the tremendous strides that have been made. We are leading the charge, making the public aware of Florida’s native plants and their roles in healthy habitat. The organization has done so much good for Florida.”
Brightman Logan

Meet our members

Dr. Loran Anderson

Member profile: Dr. Loran Anderson

Dr. Loran Anderson is a professor emeritus in the department of biological science at Florida State University in Tallahassee. His research has focused on plant taxonomy and systematics in the Florida Panhandle and elsewhere. He is currently compiling a checklist of native plants in Panhandle counties that will include rare and endangered species. Over the course of his career, he has authored numerous publications and has named (i.e., described for science) 12 new Florida native plant species or subspecies. Dr. Anderson is a long-time member of the Florida Wildflower Foundation. In 2016, he received the Foundation’s “Coreopsis Award” in recognition of contribution to Florida’s wildflowers.

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taylors

Member profile: Walter and Karin Taylor

You will find Walter and Karin Taylor at most Florida Wildflower Foundation and Florida Native Plant Society events, many times volunteering their time to speak to others or sit at information tables and promote wildflowers. They are longtime residents of Florida and experts on wildflowers, with Walter having authored numerous field guides that have become indispensable to Florida wildflower enthusiasts.

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Member profile: Alan Franck

Dr. Alan Franck is curator of the University of South Florida Herbarium in Tampa, founded in 1958. It holds 285,000 specimens, and is the second largest collection in Florida. Alan has supported the Florida Wildflower Foundation through membership since 2011. To join Alan in supporting the Florida Wildflower Foundation as a member, click here. Tell…

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Member profile: Taryn Evans

Meet Taryn Evans of Weirsdale, Florida. Taryn is an enthusiastic member of the Florida Wildflower Foundation. She has shared her expertise on pollinators at previous Florida Wildflower Foundation symposia and with the Florida Native Plant Society’s Marion Big Scrub Chapter, where she serves as president. She and her husband, Terry, own Creative Garden Structures, which sells their handmade garden furniture, bird and pollinator nest boxes, and hand-painted rain barrels, as well as Florida native plants and wildflowers.

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Boing, bottom left, with other volunteers

Volunteer finds inspiration in native flowers

When Lisa Boing, Master Gardener, Florida Botanical Gardens board member and Florida Wildflower Foundation member, responded to questions about the completion of a demonstration garden planting at the Pinellas County Extension in Largo, the portrait that emerged was one of a dedicated volunteer. We are happy to share her story here: My involvement in the…

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Member profile: Kay Yeuell and Linda Lord

Florida Wildflower Foundation member Kay Yeuell was born in Orange County, and spent his childhood in Florida and Massachusetts. After graduating from Boston University, Yeuell ran a family manufacturing business in the Boston area for 25 years. When he retired in the mid-1980s, Yeuell moved back to Florida with his wife, Linda Lord.

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FWF member Jackie Rolly

Member profile: Jackie Rolly

Jackie Rolly joined the Florida Wildflower Foundation when she purchased a license plate for her car many years ago. She’s also a member of the Florida Native Plant Society (FNPS), as well as the Audubon Society and the Sierra Club. On Mondays, you’re likely to find her at the Oakland Nature Preserve (ONP) where she’s been working since 2007. And when the travel bug bites, Rolly volunteers for expeditions with Earthwatch Institute, on which she’s done such things as helped track wild elephants in Sri Lanka and studied biodiversity in the vineyards of France.

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chris-waltz

Member profile: Chris Waltz

There’s a good chance that if you’ve been to any Florida Wildflower Foundation events, you may have run into this member. Most recently, he could be found with 25 other wildflower enthusiasts at the Tosohatchee Wildlife Management Area, soaking up some plant identification and lore on a walk led by author and FWF board member Dr. Walter K. Taylor.

FWF member Chris Waltz is known to many in native plant circles because of the supporting role he plays in conferences and other events. Here is what Chris has to say about his involvement with the Florida Wildflower Foundation.

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FWF board and founding member Anne McKay

Board member profile: Anne McKay

Instrumental in getting the Florida Wildflower Foundation off the ground, Anne Mackay continues to serve on the Foundation’s board, first serving on the Florida Wildflower Council board, then as board chair for the Florida Wildflower Foundation. Read why she stays involved.

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Board member profile: Gary Henry

Meet Gary Henry, longtime wildflower advocate and enthusiast. Gary Henry is the former Florida Department of Transportation’s landscape architect and a founding member of the Florida Wildflower Foundation board. He also was a driving force behind the establishment of the State Wildflower license plate, which funds the Foundation’s work.

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dena-wild

Board member profile: Dena Wild

Dena Wild’s career as city planner and urban designer spanned 35 years. She worked in cities throughout the country maintaining through design the character of traditional neighborhoods and commercial districts that were being affected by redevelopment. During her tenure with the City of Orlando, she was Chief Planner for Urban Design, which included overseeing the public art and historic preservation programs. She also taught urban design as a University of Central Florida adjunct professor.

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terry_zinn

Board member profile: Terry Zinn

Terry L. Zinn of Alachua has served on the Florida Wildflower Foundation Board since 2007 as a representative of the Florida Wildflower Seed and Plant Growers Association. He has practiced environmental law since 1984 and holds a bachelor’s degree in biology and a master’s degree in wildlife ecology.

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