Leavenworth’s Tickseed

Leavenworth’s Tickseed (Coreopsis leavenworthii) Blooms spring-summer; height 1-3 ft. Plant Sept.-mid-Dec. in full sun to light pine shade in slightly moist to moist sandy soil. Sow seeds in: N – September, October C – Late September to mid-November S – Mid-October to mid-December

Lanceleaf Tickseed

Lanceleaf Tickseed (Coreopsis lanceolata) Blooms in spring; height to 1-1½ ft. Plant Sept.-mid-Nov. in full sun to light pine shade in slightly dry to slightly moist well-drained soil. Sow seeds in: N – September, October C – Late September to mid-November

520_roadside_driscoll

Award-winning roadside wildflowers

In a first for Florida, a project to manage naturally occurring wildflowers – versus displays that have been planted – has been recognized for its success. The Florida Federation of Garden Clubs recently gave a “Paths of Sunshine” award to Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) District 5 for successfully protecting and nurturing a natural wildflower display along a stretch of State Road 520 in east Orange County.

Swamp tickseed (Coreopsis nudata) by Eleanor Dietrich

Flower Friday: Swamp tickseed

Swamp tickseed is a short-lived perennial with charming pink and yellow blooms. It occurs naturally in wet prairies, bogs, seepage slopes, wet flatwoods and roadside ditches. It blooms in spring (typically April and May) and is attractive to bees, although butterflies and other pollinators are known to visit them. Birds eat its seeds. Swamp tickseed is often confused with the non-native Cosmos bipinnatus.

Native Roadside Wildflowers in Rural Areas: Developing Best Management Practices for Establishment of Plantings by Seed and Enhancement of Naturally-Occurring Populations 

The main goal of this study was to determine the effects of competition and mowing on native wildflower establishment on road-side right-of-ways (ROWs) dominated by bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum). The species were Flordia ecotypes of Coreopsis lanceolata, C. leavenworthii, Gaillardia puchella, and Ipomopsis rubra. Bahiagrass competition was the main factor limiting establishment of wildflowers under simulated…

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Sweat bee on blue-eyed grass (Sisyrinchium sp.) by Mary Keim

Wildflowers bloom earlier than normal

Earlier-than-normal blooming of spring wildflowers seems to be occurring more often, but this year stands out because some wildflowers are blooming nearly a month earlier than expected. The influence of this “abnormal” weather will probably be greatest in North Florida. If the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) climate predictions hold true, March will likely be wetter and warmer than normal, which would speed up the time when mid- or late-spring wildflowers bloom, such as Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta) and Blanketflower (Gaillardia pulchella).

Dr. Loran Anderson

Member profile: Dr. Loran Anderson

Dr. Loran Anderson is a professor emeritus in the department of biological science at Florida State University in Tallahassee. His research has focused on plant taxonomy and systematics in the Florida Panhandle and elsewhere. He is currently compiling a checklist of native plants in Panhandle counties that will include rare and endangered species. Over the course of his career, he has authored numerous publications and has named (i.e., described for science) 12 new Florida native plant species or subspecies. Dr. Anderson is a long-time member of the Florida Wildflower Foundation. In 2016, he received the Foundation’s “Coreopsis Award” in recognition of contribution to Florida’s wildflowers.

Research

The why of wildflowers The State Wildflower license plate has provided more than $1 million for research projects that discover how wildflowers grow and interact with wildlife. Help feed the bees that feed us – Get your tag today. Plant for Wildlife study This four-year study, led by Dr. Jaret Daniels, of the Florida Museum…

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Handouts Shop

Great wildflowers for your dry landscape Download and print OR Order free printed versions and pay only for the shipping and handling. Read more 7 steps to collecting and sowing wildflower seed Download and print OR Order free printed versions and pay only for the shipping and handling. Read more Establishing a small planting of…

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Shop

Browse the Flower Shop Let everyone know you’re a fan of Florida’s native wildflowers. We have seeds a plenty for your landscape, and accessories for the garden. Wildflowers for home and garden Let them know… where not to mow! Protect your roadside wildflowers and help them set seed for the future by displaying this 9 x…

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Common eastern bumble bee (Bombus impatiens) on purple thistle (Cirsium horridulum) by Mary Keim

Know your native pollinators: Bumble bees

Bumble bees are very efficient pollinators because they “buzz pollinate.” The bee grabs onto a flower and vibrates its flight muscles but not its wings. This causes the flower to release its pollen. It also creates an audible buzz at the frequency of a middle C note. The genus name Bombus comes from the Greek bombos, which means “buzzing sound.”

Protect Roadside Wildflowers

Protecting pollinator habitat The State Wildflower license plate is the only consistent source of funding for roadside wildflowers. Help create pollinator pathways – Get your tag today. Delicate Beauties Many of Florida’s wildflowers are quite rare, but locally abundant on our roadsides. Find out about the wildflowers unique to your area and learn more about…

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Support wildflowers

Get the Plate Membership Donate Meet Our Champions Get the State Wildflower license plate to support the natural world Everyone loves a field of flowers… especially the bees and butterflies that depend on them. But our flowers are vanishing from our rapidly developing landscape, and just when wildlife needs them the most. Show your support…

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Grow Wildflowers

Help paint Florida with wildflowers The State Wildflower license plate helps teach residents to create sustainable landscapes that showcase Florida’s first flowers. Get yours today. Image from Nancy Bickner’s garden in Largo Florida. Start with 20 Easy Wildflowers. Learn to grow and maintain 20 foolproof Florida native wildflowers. Bring best practices home Discover the best…

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