Be in the know about pollinators

Chris delivers his pollinator pots to FWF staff.

Create a pollinator garden in a pot!

Chris Waltz, volunteer extraordinaire and wildflower-gardening enthusiast, was inspired by people saying they can’t grow natives because they live in an apartment, condo, or other small space. He started thinking: They grow houseplants and annuals; why can’t they grow natives the same way? The result? A “pollinator garden in a pot.”

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Eucera dubitata

Know your native pollinators: Long-horned bees

The Eucerini tribe is collectively referred to as the “long-horned bees,” but some genera within this tribe have other common names such as squash bees and sunflower bees. Long-horned bees can be difficult to tell apart, but males are easy to spot with their extraordinarily long antennae!

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Know your native pollinators: Mining bees

Mining bees (Andrenidae) are a diverse family and some of the first bees to fly come spring. But if you don’t see them in the air, you can usually spot their conspicuous nest entrances on the ground marked by mounds of excavated soil.

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Jonnie-Dietz_Agapostemon-sp

Know your native pollinators: Sweat bees

Halictidae, or sweat bees, are an extremely diverse group that are often abundant year round. Some are metallic green, others are smaller than a grain of rice, and nearly all are valuable pollinators.

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More buzz about pollinators

Xerces milkweeds conservation guide cover

Review of Xerces Society’s Milkweed Guide

Many of us are aware of the monarch’s population decline that has been well documented by researchers. Weather, habitat destruction of overwintering grounds in California and Mexico, and loss of food source on migration routes have caused great concern in the last…

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bee-tower

Bringing the buzz back to your garden

In the last decade or so, honey bee populations worldwide have significantly diminished due to unknown causes. Less known is the fact that native bee populations in North America are also in decline. As more rural and wild landscape becomes suburban and…

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bee-partridge-pea

Bring native bees to your landscape

Do you enjoy juicy watermelons, local blueberries and strawberries and fresh Florida orange juice? How about carrots, broccoli, almonds and apples? If you do, please thank an insect! More than 100 crops are dependent on insect pollination, resulting in an economic value…

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Are non-native milkweeds killing monarch butterflies?

Tropical milkweed can enable monarchs to continue breeding well into fall and winter, causing populations to persist longer in certain areas than they naturally would. Unfortunately, this can foster higher than normal infection rates by a lethal protozoan parasite, Ophryocystis elektroscirrha (OE).…

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Resources for protecting pollinators

20 Easy-to-Grow Wildflowers

20 Easy Wildflowers24-page booklet featuring planting and caring guides for 20 genera of Florida native wildflowers, as well as information on the bees and butterflies that they attract and support.  Download PDF here.

Guide for Choosing Native Wildflowers and Plants

Wildflowers, naturally! plant selection guideGuide to over 70 wildflowers, shrubs, vines and grasses that are native to Florida and work well in home landscapes. Helps in selection of plants that are suitable for geographic location, soil and light conditions. Also helps in choosing plants based on color,  season of bloom, and type of pollinators attracted.
Download PDF here.

Florida Wildflowers and Butterflies

Beautiful full-color, 2-sided brochure focuses on the relationships between plants and butterflies. Funded by the Florida Wildflower Foundation. Download PDF here.

“Butterflies are self-propelled flowers.”
— Robert A. Heinlen