These are news stories about pollinators

CeraunusBlueButterfly (Hemiargus ceraunus) by Mary Keim

Know your native pollinators: Ceraunus blue

Ceraunus blue butterflies, found in the gossamer-winged family, fly in southern Florida throughout the year. The common name of these small butterflies comes from the violet blue of the male’s dorsal side. Females have a smaller amount of blue which is located on their dorsal side at the base of their wings. The larval hosts of the Ceraunus blue are plants in the Fabaceae family.

 

 

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White peacock butterfly

Know your native pollinators: White peacock

White peacock butterflies, found in the brush-footed family, fly in Florida throughout the year. They are small white butterflies with brown markings and orange margins. The common name of the White peacock comes from black spots on the forewings and hindwings, giving the appearance of a peacock’s eyespot. You might notice these lovely winged friends flying close to the ground searching for Turkey-tangle frogfruit, which acts as both a host and nectar plant for them.

 

 

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Pipevine swallowtail on Butterflyweed, Asclepias tuberosa

Know your native pollinators: Pipevine swallowtail

This charming swallowtail butterfly is easily distinguishable by the iridescent blue shimmer glowing from the hindwing when wings are open, and the orange spots and blue background on the hindwing when the wings are closed. Wings are black aside from these splashes of color.

 

 

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Queen butterfly on Swamp milkweed, Asclepias perennis

Know your native pollinators: Queen butterfly

In the same genus as Monarchs, Queen butterflies share many characteristics with their royal cousins. Queens and Monarchs are similar in appearance, rely on milkweed as a host plant and carry a toxin from milkweed in their bodies into adulthood. Queens do not participate in the same migration as Monarchs, however, and have distinguishing physical differences.

 

 

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Ruby-throated hummingbird

Know your native pollinators: Ruby-throated hummingbird

Bees and butterflies are not our only important pollinators. Hummingbirds play an essential role in dispersing pollen as well. The ruby-throated hummingbird, the most commonly found hummingbird in the eastern United States, is attracted to orange or red tubular flowers.

 

 

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Phaon crescent on frogfruit

Know your native pollinators: Phaon crescent

The Phaon crescent butterfly is primarily attracted to frogfruit plants, utilizing them for nectar and as a larval host. Frogfruit is a small flowering groundcover that can be a great alternative to turf grass. Since frogfruits cannot withstand freezing temperatures, you will likely only find this butterfly in the southern regions of the United States. Phaon crescents can live in peninsular Florida throughout the year. These butterflies like moist open areas such as dunes, pastures, roadsides and clearings in dense forest thickets.

 

 

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