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Children planting wildflowers

Apply now for school garden grants

The Florida Wildflower Foundation’s Seedlings for School program is now accepting applications for campus wildflower garden grants. Public and private pre-K to 12-grade schoolteachers may apply to receive a grant.

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Janice Broda

Member profile: Janice Broda

Get to know Florida Wildflower Foundation member Janice Broda. Janice has been attending Foundation field trips, symposiums and webinars regularly since 2014. Exceptionally active in her community, she has served on the board of directors of the Indian River Mosquito Control District for nearly 30 years and is a founding member of her Florida Native Plant Society (FNPS) chapter. Janice currently coordinates the Volunteer Nature Stewardship Program for the Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory.

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Nash Turley with orange milkweed flowers

Webinar: Lawn to Wildflowers

Dr. Nash Turley of UCF will introduce his project Lawn to Wildflowers, a community science effort focused on converting lawns to pollinator-friendly wildflower habitat while engaging the public in collecting plant pollinator data.

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CeraunusBlueButterfly (Hemiargus ceraunus) by Mary Keim

Know your native pollinators: Ceraunus blue

Ceraunus blue butterflies, found in the gossamer-winged family, fly in southern Florida throughout the year. The common name of these small butterflies comes from the violet blue of the male’s dorsal side. Females have a smaller amount of blue which is located on their dorsal side at the base of their wings. The larval hosts of the Ceraunus blue are plants in the Fabaceae family.

 

 

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Viva Florida grant opens

The Foundation is now accepting applications for its Viva Florida Landscape Demonstration grant. The grants provide assistance to Florida parks, nature centers, county extension offices and other public spaces that wish to establish or augment wildflower demonstration gardens. Resulting gardens showcase the beauty and variety of Florida’s native wildflowers while demonstrating their use in conventional landscapes.

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Drs. Pam and Doug Soltis

Webinar: Using Evolutionary History as a Tool for Plant Conservation

What will Florida’s ecosystems look and feel like in the future? Using herbarium records, scientists can predict how Florida’s native plants will react to our changing climate. In this free webinar, Drs. Pamela and Douglas Soltis will discuss how an “evolutionary tree” is being built with molecular samples from herbarium collections to predict Florida’s natural future.

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