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Eumaeus atala by Mary Keim

Know your native pollinators: Atala

Florida once teemed with Atala butterflies but overharvesting of the Atala’s host plant Coontie caused a drastic decline in butterfly populations. During the mid-20th century Atalas were thought to be extinct. Now populations are rebounding thanks to the high demand for Coontie in native landscaping. Atalas are lovely hairstreak butterflies with velvety black wings that shine with an iridescent aquamarine. The underside of their wings displays three rows of small aquamarine dots and a larger reddish orange spot on the hindwing.

 

 

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Wild coffee, Psychotria nervosa

Webinar: Landscaping in Shady Areas

Here in Florida, shade is a valuable part of our landscapes, but it creates challenges. That’s because plants feed on sunlight and even the most shade-tolerant plants require it to grow and flower. In dense shade, few plants survive for long. Watch this video, where Dr. Craig Huegel introduces you to the complex concept called shade and how to work with it to achieve beautiful results.

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Create a Pollinator Pot

The insects that pollinate our food crops and natural areas are in steep decline. Our suburban landscapes are more important than ever in supporting them. No place for a garden? No problem! Our new video and handout can help you create a small pollinator oasis in a pot!

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Hairy chaffhead and Smallfruit beggarticks along roadside

Webinar: Save Our Roadsides

In this 90-minute workshop, we will launch the North Florida Wildflower Alliance and show participants how to help conserve roadside wildflowers and set up a wildflower program in their counties. Speakers include butterfly expert Dr. Jaret Daniels, Neil Greishaw of Alachua County’s amazing roadside wildflower program, and Cindy Tramel of the Florida Department of Transportation.
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Dick Bush

In memory: Dick Bush

Our wildflower family has lost a dear friend. Dick Bush, the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) District 2 wildflower coordinator until his retirement in 2015, passed away on Feb. 24. He gave his all to the job he loved, and roadsides from Nassau to Levy counties showed it. In 2015, the Foundation gave Dick its Coreopsis Award – its highest honor – in recognition of his lifetime of service of Florida, its environment and its wildflowers.

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