“Flower Friday” is a weekly profile of a different Florida native wildflower.

False indigo (Amorpha fruticosa) by Mary Keim

Flower Friday: False indigo

False indigo (Amorpha fruticosa) is a densely branched woody shrub with a striking spring and summer floral display. It occurs naturally in alluvial forests, wet and coastal hammocks, cypress pond edges, and along stream and river banks. It attracts many pollinators and is the larval host plant for the silver-spotted skipper, Southern dogface and gray hairstreak butterflies.

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White wild indigo (Baptisia alba) by Lisa Roberts

Flower Friday: White wild indigo

White wild indigo (Baptisia alba) is a long-lived perennial herbaceous wildflower with showy white blooms. It occurs naturally in pine flatwoods and along riverbanks and deciduous forest edges. It attracts many pollinators and is the larval host plant for the wild indigo duskywing and Zarucco duskywing butterflies. The fruits are eaten by a variety of birds, and the foliage is browsed by rabbits and deer. (The plant’s large tuberous roots allow it to withstand browsing.)

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Fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus). Photo by Lisa Roberts.

Flower Friday: Fringetree

Also known as old man’s beard (or grancy graybeard in limited circles), Fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus) is often overshadowed by dogwood, plum and other spring-flowering trees. But Fringetree’s graceful tassled flowers put on an equally spectacular display. It occurs naturally in a variety of habitats including moist hammocks and sandy uplands. It attracts many pollinators, including bats, and is the larval host plant for several species of sphinx moths. Birds love the fruits.

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Mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia)

Flower Friday: Mountain laurel

Mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia) is an evergreen, perennial shrub to small tree that puts on a spectacular springtime display. It occurs naturally in slope forests, bluffs and along creeks, seep streams and swamp edges. It attracts bees and provides cover for birds and small mammals. Mountain laurel is a state-listed threatened species in Florida.

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Lanceleaf tickseed (Coreopsis lanceolata) by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Lanceleaf tickseed

Lanceleaf tickseed (Coreopsis lanceolata) is a perennial wildflower with conspicuously sunny blooms that typically appear in spring and sometimes into summer. It occurs naturally in moist sandhills, marshes, and along swamp edges. It attracts butterflies and other pollinators, and its seeds are commonly eaten by birds and small wildlife. Lanceleaf tickseed is one of 13 species of Coreopsis native to Florida. Coreopsis is Florida’s state wildflower.

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Eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis). Photo by Eleanor Dietrich

Flower Friday: Eastern redbud

Eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis) is a deciduous perennial tree that produces an abundance of striking magenta blooms. It typically flowers in March, at which time the entire crown of the tree will become covered in deep pink blooms. It occurs naturally in mesic hardwood hammocks. Eastern redbud depends on bees for pollination. Its leaves provide food for many caterpillars, including the io moth.

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