“Flower Friday” is a weekly profile of a different Florida native wildflower.

Pale meadowbeauty (Rhexia mariana)

Flower Friday: Pale meadowbeauty

Pale meadow beauty (Rhexia mariana) is an herbaceous perennial wildflower with showy blooms that vary in color from white to pink. It occurs naturally in wet flatwoods, open savannas, marshes, bogs and wet roadsides. It flowers spring through fall and attracts many bees and butterflies.

Read more
Spanish bayonet (Yucca aloifolia). Photo by Stacey Matrazzo.

Flower Friday: Spanish bayonet

Spanish bayonet (Yucca aloifolia) is an erect, woody evergreen shrub that produces large (1-3 feet) terminal panicles of showy white flowers. It occurs naturally in sandhills, dry thickets, disturbed sites, and coastal strands, hammocks and grasslands. It flowers spring through fall and provides food and cover for a variety of wildlife and pollinators. The blooms are frequented for their nectar by hummingbirds and butterflies such as the Great southern white. Spanish bayonet is also the larval host plant for the Cofaqui giant skipper and yucca giant skipper butterflies.

Read more
Swamp azalea (Rhododendron viscous). Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Swamp azalea

Swamp azalea (Rhododendron viscosum) is a long-lived perennial shrub to small tree with fragrant white blooms. It occurs naturally in wet flatwoods, seep and bay swamps and along lake margins. It flowers late spring through summer after the leaves emerge. It is attractive to a variety of pollinators, including hummingbirds. Swamp azalea is Florida’s only white-flowered and summer-blooming rhododendron.

Read more
Southern beeblossom (Oenothera simulans). Photo by Mary Keim

Flower Friday: Southern beeblossom

Southern beeblossom (Oenothera simulans) is an erect herbaceous annual that occurs naturally along roadsides and in pinelands, open woods and sandy fields. It flowers spring through summer and attracts a wide range of small pollinators, including moths and bees. The pollen grains are held together by a threadlike substance and can only be collected by pollinators that are morphologically specialized. Its flowers open at night (hence the family name, evening primrose), so only pollinators that forage at night can pollinate them. Birds have been known to eat Southern beeblossom seeds.

Read more
Pricklypear cactus (Opuntia humifosa). Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Pricklypear cactus

Pricklypear cactus (Opuntia humifusa) occurs naturally in scrub, scrubby flatwoods, sandhills, coastal strands, ruderal sites and dry, open areas. It flowers in late spring and attracts a wide range of pollinators, especially native bees. The fleshy fruits and seeds are eaten by birds, small mammals and gopher tortoises (who also enjoy browsing the pads).

Read more
Blue-eyed grass (Sisyrinchium angustifolium). Photo by Mary Keim

Flower Friday: Blue-eyed grass

The low profile of Blue-eyed grass (Sisyrinchium angustifolium) makes it an excellent groundcover choice. It is fairly adaptable to conditions of drought and partial shade, but planting in full sun and moist soil will result in denser foliage and more flowers.

Read more