“Flower Friday” is a weekly profile of a different Florida native wildflower.

Comfortroot (Hibiscus aculeatus). Photo by Eleanor Dietrich

Flower Friday: Comfortroot

Comfortroot, also known as pineland hibiscus, is a large perennial wildflower with showy cream-colored blooms. It occurs naturally in wet to mesic pinelands, and along the edges of savannas, bogs and roadside ditches. It typically blooms late spring through fall and attracts pollinators, specifically bees. The common name comfortroot may allude to the belief that the plant’s mucilaginous roots has soothing properties.

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Spotted water hemlock (Cicuta maculata). Photo by Mary Keim

Flower Friday: Spotted water hemlock

Spotted water hemlock is a robust herbaceous perennial with a bad reputation of being one of the most toxic plants known to man. It occurs naturally in freshwater swamps, marshes and floodplains, and along riverbanks and roadside ditches. It blooms spring through fall, attracting many species of bees, wasps and butterflies. It is a larval host plant for the black swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes).

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Hairy leafcup (Smallanthus uvedalia). Photo by R.W. Smith, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Flower Friday: Hairy leafcup

Hairy leaf cup (Smallanthus uvedalia) occurs naturally in upland hardwood forests, slope forests, upland mixed woodlands, and moist shaded hammocks. It typically blooms in summer and attracts a variety of bees and other pollinators.

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Pitted stripeseed (Piriqueta cistoides subsp. caroliniana) Photo by Wayne Matchett

Flower Friday: Pitted stripeseed

Also known as morning buttercup, pitted stripeseed (Piriqueta cistoides) is a cheerful perennial wildflower. It emerges in early spring in open, sandy areas of pine flatwoods and sandhills. It typically blooms in late summer, although it can bloom year-round in southern climes. It attracts small bees and butterflies.

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Baldwin's eryngo (Eryngium baldwinii) Photo by Craig Huegel.

Flower Friday: Baldwin’s eryngo

Baldwin’s eryngo (Eryngium baldwinii) is a deciduous perennial (sometimes biennial) wildflower with a prostrate, vine-like growth habit. You’ll rarely notice it as you drive along the highway, but it can form a large sprawling groundcover, providing a hazy, light blue understory to other wildflowers. It occurs naturally in wet hammocks and in disturbed areas such as moist roadsides. It typically blooms in summer, although it has been known to bloom as early as spring and into the fall. It attracts small bees and butterflies.

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Whorled milkweed (Asclepias verticillata). Photo by Eleanor Dietrich

Flower Friday: Whorled milkweed

Like all milkweeds, whorled milkweed (Asclepias verticillata) is a larval host plant for the monarch butterfly and is attractive to a variety of pollinators. It flowers late spring through late summer/early fall. .

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