“Flower Friday” is a weekly profile of a different Florida native wildflower.

Summer farewell (Dalea pinnata). Photo by Mary Keim

Flower Friday: Summer farewell

Say hello to summer farewell, a perennial herbaceous wildflower native to sandhills, dry flatwoods and scrub habitat. As the common name implies, summer farewell (Dalea pinnata) blooms in late summer and early fall. Its many white flowers attract butterflies, bees, and other pollinators. Its seeds provide food for birds and small wildlife. Summer farewell makes an excellent addition to a dry, sunny wildflower garden. It is dormant in the winter, but its spring leaves, summer and fall flowers, and fall seed pods provide plenty of color throughout the rest of the year.

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Dogtongue wild buckwheat (Eriogonum tomentosum). Photo by Mary Keim

Flower Friday: Dogtongue wild buckwheat

Even cat people love dogtongue wild buckwheat! This herbaceous perennial produces a plethora of white to pinkish flowers in late summer and fall. You’ll find it blooming in sandhills, scrub and pinelands in the Panhandle and north and central peninsula. It attracts a variety of pollinators, including the thread-waisted wasp (Eremnophila aureonotata) and tiphiid wasp (Myzinum sp.).

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Grassleaf Barbaras' buttons (Marshallia graminifolia). Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Barbara’s buttons

No one knows who Barbara is, but we can surely admire her buttons! A member of the aster family, Grassleaf Barbara’s buttons (Marshallia graminifolia) is a fragrant wildflower with showy, solitary blooms that have a tassled, button-like appearance. Each flower has many whitish-pink to pale lavender disk florets arranged in a concentric circle — and no ray florets. It blooms summer through fall and like most Asters, attracts a plethora of pollinators.

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Sandbog deathcamas (Zigadenus glaberrimus) Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Sandbog deathcamas

What’s in a name? Well, if it’s sandbog deathcamas, everything is in the name! Sandbog deathcamas (Zigadenus glaberrimus) is a poisonous wildflower native to wet flatwoods and prairies in the Panhandle. Its many star-shaped flowers are cream-colored with greenish-gold glands at the base of their petals. It blooms summer through fall (it’s blooming now!) and attracts bees, butterflies and other pollinators.

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Pineland heliotrope (Euploca polyphylla). Photo by Alan Cressler, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Flower Friday: Pineland heliotrope

Don’t forget pineland heliotrope (Euploca polyphylla) if you’re looking for year-round blooms! This member of the forget-me-not family is a Florida endemic and is adaptable to a variety of conditions. Its small white or yellow flowers attract many pollinators.

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Hummingbird clearwing (Hemaris thysbe) on Asclepias incarnata

Flower Friday: Swamp milkweed

Pink milkweed is an erect, herbaceous perennial wildflower with showy pink flowers. It occurs naturally in floodplain swamps, hydric hammocks, wet pine flatwoods and marshes. It typically blooms in summer and attracts many pollinators. It is a larval host plant for Monarch, Queen and Soldier butterfly caterpillars.

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