“Flower Friday” is a weekly profile of a different Florida native wildflower.

Rusty lyonia (Lyonia ferruginea) Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Rusty lyonia

Also known as rusty staggerbush, rusty lyonia (Lyonia ferruginea) is a long-lived evergreen flowering shrub. Its common descriptor, “rusty,” and its species epithet, ferruginea, both refer to the many rust-colored hairs that cover the plant’s leaves, stems and trunk. It occurs naturally in scrub, scrubby flatwoods, xeric hammocks and moist pine flatwoods. Flowers typically appear in spring but can bloom as early as late winter.

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Crossvine (Bignonia capreolata) by Eleanor Dietrich

Flower Friday: Crossvine

Crossvine (Bignonia capreolata) is a perennial evergreen vine, so named because a cross section of its stem reveals a cross-shaped pattern. It typically blooms in spring, when it puts on a spectacular display, but they can appear as early as February and as late as June. It occurs naturally in mesic to dry hammocks, floodplain forests and dry hardwood forests. It is mainly pollinated by hummingbirds but attracts some butterflies, as well.

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Spotted wakerobin (Trillium maculatum). Photo by Eleanor Dietrich

Flower Friday: Wakerobin

Wakerobins (Trillium spp.) are long-lived perennial wildflowers native to upland hardwood forests, slope forests, hammocks and bluffs. They typically bloom in late winter before the tree canopy leafs out, but can bloom as late as early spring. The common name wakerobin refers to the flower appearing around the same time as the first robins. It is also known as birthroot due to its medicinal use during childbirth, and toadshade because some have said it resembles a toad-sized umbrella.

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Bay lobelia (Lobelia feayana). Photo by Mary Keim

Flower Friday: Bay lobelia

Bay lobelia (Lobelia feayana) is a dainty endemic perennial commonly seen on moist roadsides. It typically blooms in January through early spring, but can bloom year-round. The plant occurs naturally in moist habitats, particularly roadside ditches and depressions where, en mass, it appears as a brilliant blue haze.

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Ashe's calamint (Calamintha ashei). Photo by Alan Cressler, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Flower Friday: Ashe’s calamint

Ashe’s calamint (Calamintha ashei) is a state-threatened perennial shrub that produces many tubular-shaped lavender flowers. It typically blooms in spring but can bloom as early as January and as late as summer or early fall. Its leaves emit a strong basil-like scent when crushed. Bees love Ashe’s calamint!

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Coastal searocket (Cakile lanceolata) Photo by Katherine Easterling

Flower Friday: Coastal searocket

Coastal searocket (Cakile lanceolata) is a charming little wildflower found on dunes and strands in many of Florida’s coastal counties. It typically blooms in early spring and summer, but can bloom year-round. The specimen in the photo was recently spotted on St. George Island in the Panhandle. The flowers attract bees and butterflies, including the great southern white, for which it is a larval host. The stems and leaves are edible.

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