Seedlings for Schools garden

Wildflower gardens to flourish at 33 schools across Florida

The Florida Wildflower Foundation has awarded 2018 Seedlings for Schools grants to 33 schools in 18 counties across the state. Each grant includes wildflower plants, expert guidance from the Foundation, and curriculum resources, including the Foundation’s Wild About Wildflowers! Activity Guide. Teachers will receive plants in the fall and will be eligible to receive more plants in spring 2019 if their fall gardens are successful.

eriocaulon decangulare

Flower Friday: Tenangle pipewort

Also known as Hat pins and Bog buttons, Tenangle pipewort (Eriocaulon decangulare) is a wildflower easily recognized by its many white buttonlike flowers. It occurs naturally in bogs, wet prairies, freshwater marshes, wet pine flatwoods and cypress swamp edges and typically blooms late spring through fall.

Snow squarestem (Melanthera nivea) by Eleanor Dietrich

Flower Friday: Snow squarestem

Snow squarestem (Melanthera nivea) is a robust bushy wildflower that occurs naturally in dry to moist flatwoods, prairies and disturbed open habitats. It typically blooms summer through early winter, but can bloom year-round, attracting bees, butterflies and other pollinators. It’s also known as Cat’s tongue, Salt and pepper and Nonpareil.

longleaf milkweed

Flower Friday: Longleaf milkweed

Longleaf milkweed is a deciduous perennial wildflower that occurs naturally in bogs, moist to wet flatwoods and prairies. It typically blooms in spring but may bloom well into summer or early fall. It is a larval host plant for Monarch and Queen butterflies, and an important nectar source for bees and wasps.

Mock bishopsweed (Ptilimnium capillaceum). Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Mock bishopsweed

Mock bishopsweed (Ptilimnium capillaceum) is a delicate little annual that is too often disregarded as a weed. But despite its small stature, it is both attractive and ecologically beneficial, especially when it occurs in mass. Its many dainty white flowers typically appear in spring and summer in swamps, marshes, coastal swales, ditches and along pond edges. Like most members of the Apiaceae family, mock bishopsweed has a long taproot, which helps the plants survive “hazards” such as drought and being eaten by black swallowtail caterpillars.