Whitemouth dayflower (Commelina erecta) by Mary Keim

Flower Friday: Whitemouth dayflower

Whitemouth dayflower (Commelina erect) is an erect ephemeral wildflower found in pinelands, coastal uplands and scrub habitats. It generally blooms in summer and fall, but is known to bloom year-round in South Florida. Blooms attract a variety of pollinators, especially bees. Seeds are eaten by birds, and the foliage is sometimes consumed by gopher tortoises. The plant is also edible to humans. The flowers can be eaten raw or candied. Leaves are best cooked (boiled or fried), but the young shoots and tips can be eaten raw.

Pinewoods milkweed (Asclepias humistrata) by Eleanor Dietrich

Flower Friday: Pinewoods milkweed

Also known as sandhill or purple milkweed, pinewoods milkweed (Asclepias humistrata) is a robust perennial #wildflower with umbels of distinct pinkish-white to pale purple flowers. Its large leaves are thick and dull grayish-green with conspicuous pink to lavender veins. Pinewoods milkweed occurs naturally in sandhills, scrub and dry, ruderal areas. It blooms in spring and summer, attracting many pollinators including wasps and butterflies, and is the larval host plant of monarch and queen butterflies.

Shiny blueberry (Vaccinium myrsinites) by Mary Keim

Flower Friday: Shiny blueberry

Shiny blueberry (Vaccinium myrsinites) is a low evergreen shrub that flowers heavily in the spring. It occurs naturally in mesic pine flatwoods, sandhills, scrubby flatwoods, dry prairies and scrub habitats. The flowers attract a variety of pollinators. The fruits are consumed by birds and other wildlife – humans enjoy them, too!

Swamp tickseed (Coreopsis nudata) by Eleanor Dietrich

Flower Friday: Swamp tickseed

Swamp tickseed is a short-lived perennial with charming pink and yellow blooms. It occurs naturally in wet prairies, bogs, seepage slopes, wet flatwoods and roadside ditches. It blooms in spring (typically April and May) and is attractive to bees, although butterflies and other pollinators are known to visit them. Birds eat its seeds. Swamp tickseed is often confused with the non-native Cosmos bipinnatus.

Parsley haw (Crataegus marshallii). Photo by Chris M. Morris (Creative Commons: CC BY 2.0)

Flower Friday: Parsley haw

Parsley haw (Crataegus marshallii) is a deciduous flowering shrub or small tree. It occurs naturally in moist wooded slopes, floodplains and riverine forests in the Panhandle and north and west-central peninsula. Its flowers, which bloom in the spring, are an important source of nectar for a variety of pollinators. The plant is a larval food source for many butterfly and moth species, and provides food and shelter for birds and small mammals.

Southeastern sneezeweed (Helenium pinnatifidum). Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Southeastern sneezeweed

Southeastern sneezeweed (Helenium pinnatifidum) is a sunny spring bloomer found throughout most of Florida. But don’t let its name fool you — sneezeweed does not refer to the biological reaction one might have to smelling it. Rather, it is a reference to the plant’s historic use. Native Americans were known to dry and grind into a powder certain species of Helenium and use it as snuff.

Wild columbine (Aquilegia canandensis). Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Wild columbine

Wild columbine (Aquilegia canadensis) is one of Florida’s most striking and unique native #wildflowers. It occurs naturally in only three counties in the Panhandle (where it is a state-listed endangered species) but given the right conditions, it can grow in landscapes as far south as Central Florida. It is found in limestone outcroppings and calcareous and is common in Florida Caverns State Park. Wild columbine blooms in spring. Its nectar is a favorite of hummingbirds and long-tongued bees, butterflies and moths. Small birds enjoy its seeds.

Swamp leather-flower (Clematis crispa). Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Swamp leather-flower

Swamp leather-flower (Clematis crispa) is a perennial vine with distinct nodding flowers that have no petals. Rather, each bloom has four large petal-like sepals that are fused at the base, giving it a bell- or urn-like shape. The sepals separate and curl back as the flower opens. Swamp leather-flower occurs naturally in floodplain forests, wet hammocks and riverine swamps. It typically blooms in spring and summer, attracting a variety of pollinators. The seeds provide food for many birds and small wildlife.

Southern crabapple (Malus angustifolia). Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Southern crabapple

Southern crabapple (Malus angustifolia) is a deciduous flowering shrub to small tree with showy pink blossoms. It occurs naturally in open woods and disturbed areas in Florida’s Panhandle, where it is a state-threatened species. Its fragrant spring blooms are pollinated primarily by bees, but butterflies are also known to visit them. Birds and other wildlife love its ripe fruits. Humans do, too — but not raw! They contain malic acid, which makes them sour and astringent. They are tastiest when made into jelly or jam!

Flower Friday: Solomon’s seal

Solomon’s seal (Polygonatum biflorum) is a unique perennial wildflower that typically blooms in spring. Its pendulous, greenish-white flowers hang in pairs from the leaf axils and are often obscured by leaves. Its leaf surfaces are bright green with a gold iridescence. Wildlife enjoy its ripe berries, while humans may eat the rhizomes and young shoots. The plant also possesses medicinal properties

Wildflowers bloom earlier than normal

Earlier-than-normal blooming of spring wildflowers seems to be occurring more often, but this year stands out because some wildflowers are blooming nearly a month earlier than expected. The influence of this “abnormal” weather will probably be greatest in North Florida. If the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) climate predictions hold true, March will likely be wetter and warmer than normal, which would speed up the time when mid- or late-spring wildflowers bloom, such as Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta) and Blanketflower (Gaillardia pulchella).