Blanketflower (Gaillardia pulchella) Photo by Jeff Norcini

Flower Friday: Blanketflower

Blanketflower, also known as Indian blanket or firewheel, is a brightly colored herbaceous wildflower that blooms in spring, summer and into fall in North Florida, and year-round in Central and South Florida. It occurs naturally in dry savannahs, coastal dunes and other dry, open areas. The blooms attract a variety of pollinators.

Delaware Skipper (Anatrytone logan) on Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentals). Photo by Mary Keim

Flower Friday: Buttonbush

Buttonbush is a large wetland shrub that produces many globular, white flowers with protruding pistils that give them a pincushion-like appearance. It occurs naturally in wetlands and along stream and river edges. The flowers attract many bees, butterflies and moths; the seeds are eaten by ducks and other birds; and the foliage is browsed by deer.

String lily (Crinum americanum). Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: String lily

Also known as seven sisters or swamp lily, string lily is an erect, emergent perennial with showy, fragrant blooms. It is found in wet hammocks, marshes, swamps, wetland edges, and along streams and rivers throughout Florida and the southeast United States. The bulbs and leaves are poisonous to humans, but are a favorite treat of lubber grasshoppers.

Marsh-pink (Sabatia grandiflora). Photo by Mary Keim

Flower Friday: Marsh-pink

Also known as largeflower rosegentian, marsh-pink is a beautiful herbaceous wildflower found in mesic pine flatwoods and wet prairies throughout Florida. In northern Florida, its showy blooms appear in summer, but it can bloom year-round in southern Florida. It is almost endemic, occurring in only one county in Alabama outside of the state of Florida.

Tia Tyler, the second of two students supported by FWF, is advised by Dr. Hector Perez, Associate Professor at the Plant Restoration and Conservation Horticulture Consortium at the Department of Environmental Horticulture, University of Florida.

Student spotlight: Tia Tyler

The Florida Wildflower Foundation provides scholarships for masters students studying wildflowers within the University of Florida’s Plant Restoration and Conservation Horticulture Consortium of the Department of Environmental Horticulture in Gainesville. Tia Tyler, the second of two students supported by FWF, is advised by Dr. Hector Perez, Associate Professor at the Plant Restoration and Conservation Horticulture Consortium at the Department of Environmental Horticulture, University of Florida.

Oblongleaf twinflower (Dyschoriste oblongifolia) Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Oblongleaf twinflower

If you are tired of mowing, watering and fertilizing the lawn, and fighting chinch bugs and other lawn pests, consider replacing your turf grass with oblongleaf twinflower, an easy-to-care-for native groundcover. It occurs naturally in dry to moist sandhills, flatwoods and mixed upland forests and attracts bees and butterflies, including the malachite (Siproeta stelenes) and white peacock (Anartia jatrophae). It is also a host plant for the common buckeye (Junonia coenia).

Spiderwort (Tradescantia ohiensis). Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Spiderwort

Spiderwort is an erect perennial wildflower that is very attractive to bees. And like all species in the dayflower family, it is ephemeral, meaning its flowers stay open only one day. Four species of spiderwort are native to Florida, with hairyflower spiderwort (T. hirsutiflora) growing in the Panhandle, and bluejacket or Ohio spiderwort (T. ohiensis) being the most common throughout North and Central Florida.

Toadflax (Linaria canadensis). Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Blue toadflax

Also known as Canadian toadflax, blue toadflax is an annual (or occasionally biennial) wildflower that forms a delicate sea of lavender when in bloom. It is common along roadsides, in pastures and in other disturbed areas and is sometimes confused with lyreleaf sage (Salvia lyrata) because of its similar growth habit and bloom color, and because they often grow together.