Boing, bottom left, with other volunteers

Volunteer finds inspiration in native flowers

When Lisa Boing, Master Gardener, Florida Botanical Gardens board member and Florida Wildflower Foundation member, responded to questions about the completion of a demonstration garden planting at the Pinellas County Extension in Largo, the portrait that emerged was one of a dedicated volunteer. We are happy to share her story here: My involvement in the…

Chickasaw plum blossoms Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Chickasaw plum

Chickasaw plum is a deciduous flowering shrub or small tree that produces profuse white blooms, making for a spectacular early spring display. It occurs naturally in dry hammocks, woodland edges, and disturbed areas and roadsides. The flowers are attractive to pollinators; the fruit is eaten by birds and other wildlife — and humans! (They are quite tart!)

Panhandle interest puts wildflowers on fast track

BLOUNTSTOWN – It was a beautiful day in Calhoun County – blue skies, maple tree seed pods shining red – when about 70 people streamed in from 15 counties streamed into Rivertown Community Church. Drawn by their common passion for Florida’s wildflowers, they had came to learn more about fostering wildflowers along federal, state and…

Wild petunia (Ruellia caroliniensis) by Jim Haley

Flower Friday: Wild petunia

Wild petunia is a low-growing, erect perennial wildflower that typically blooms in late spring through late summer/early fall. It occurs naturally in mesic hammocks, flatwoods and sandhills, and along roadsides and in disturbed sites. It is the host plant for the white peacock (Anartia jatrophae) and common buckeye (Junonia coenia) butterflies, but attracts a variety of pollinators.

Xerces milkweeds conservation guide cover

Review of Xerces Society’s Milkweed Guide

Many of us are aware of the monarch’s population decline that has been well documented by researchers. Weather, habitat destruction of overwintering grounds in California and Mexico, and loss of food source on migration routes have caused great concern in the last few years. The Xerces Society’s insight into factors that influence monarch butterfly populations has pointed to many things we cannot control. However, the increased production and planting of the monarch food plants, milkweeds, is certainly an environmental movement that can be achieved on a large scale in the United States.