Lemon bacopa (Bacopa caroliniana) Photo by Eleanor Dietrich

Flower Friday: Lemon bacopa

Lemon bacopa (also known as blue waterhyssop) is a low-growing, mat-forming, perennial herbaceous wildflower that grows in very moist to aquatic habitats. It typically blooms late spring through fall, but can bloom year-round. It occurs naturally along pond and stream margins, and in swamps, marshes and shallow ditches. Its nectar is used by a variety of small pollinators.

Standing cypress (Ipomopsis rubra) by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Standing cypress

Standing cypress is a brilliant, biennial herbaceous wildflower. Contrary to its common name, it is not related to the cypress tree (Taxodium spp.). It blooms summer through fall and occurs naturally in sandhills, coastal strands, beach dunes and ruderal areas. It is very attractive to butterflies as well as other pollinators.

Thistleleaf aster (Eurybia eryngiifolia) Photo by Eleanor Dietrich

Flower Friday: Thistleleaf aster

Thistleleaf aster is an herbaceous perennial wildflower that occurs only in Florida’s eastern Panhandle and in a few neighboring counties in Alabama and Georgia. Its blooms are fairly large and appear in late spring through fall. It occurs naturally in wet prairies, wiregrass savannas and wet pine flatwoods and is loved by many bees and butterflies.

Sagittaria lancifolia Photo by Eleanor Dietrich

Flower Friday: Arrowhead

Also known as duck potato, arrowhead is a perennial emergent aquatic wildflower. It typically blooms spring through fall and occurs naturally in marshes, swamps, streams, spring runs, rivers, lake edges and roadside ditches. Its flowers are attractive to a variety of pollinators. Its fruits are eaten by birds and other wildlife.

Camphorweed (Heterotheca subaxillaris) Photo by Alan Cressler, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Flower Friday: Camphorweed

Camphorweed is an aromatic, annual to biennial herbaceous shrub. It typically blooms in summer and fall, although in certain conditions it may bloom year-round. It occurs naturally on coastal dunes and grasslands, in scrubs, pinelands and ruderal areas. It is attractive to many bees and butterflies. As the common name suggests, camphorweed has a camphor-like aroma (or odor, as some might suggest), particularly when the leaves are disturbed.

Leafcutter bee on Pickerelweed

Flower Friday: Pickerelweed

Pickerelweed is a long-lived, perennial aquatic wildflower. It typically blooms in spring through summer and occurs naturally in open, aquatic habitats such as pond, lake or river edges, marshes and swamps. It is pollinated primarily by bees, but is visited by many butterflies and other insects.

Powderpuff (Mimosa strigillosa)

Flower Friday: Powderpuff

Powderpuff (also known as sunshine mimosa) is a prostrate, mat-forming perennial wildflower with showy “powderpuff” blooms that appear in spring through summer. It occurs naturally in open, disturbed areas and along roadsides. It is pollinated mainly by bees, but is the host plant for the little sulphur (Eurema lisa) butterfly.

Woodland pinkroot (Spigelia marilandica) by Eleanor Dietrich

Flower Friday: Woodland pinkroot

Woodland pinkroot is a showy perennial wildflower. It blooms in late spring through summer and sometimes into fall. It occurs naturally in upland hardwood forests, slope forests and bluffs, and is pollinated by hummingbirds as well as other insects. There are approximately 60 species of Spigelia that occur from the southern US south to Argentina. Only four species are native to Florida.

Carolina redroot (Lachnanthes caroliana)

Flower Friday: Carolina redroot

Carolina redroot is a perennial herbaceous wildflower that blooms from summer into fall. It occurs naturally in wet flatwoods, marshes, bogs, dome swamps, savannas and coastal swales. Its blooms are attractive to a variety of butterflies and moths; its seeds are eaten by birds; and the whole plant is favored by feral hogs, who are known to dig up and eat large patches of redroot.

Chris delivers his pollinator pots to FWF staff.

Create a pollinator garden in a pot!

Chris Waltz, volunteer extraordinaire and wildflower-gardening enthusiast, was inspired by people saying they can’t grow natives because they live in an apartment, condo, or other small space. He started thinking: They grow houseplants and annuals; why can’t they grow natives the same way? The result? A “pollinator garden in a pot.”