Indian pink (Spigelia marilandica) in Torreya State Park (Gadsden County, FL). Photo by John Moran

Flower Friday: Woodland pinkroot

Woodland pinkroot is a showy perennial wildflower. It blooms in late spring through summer and sometimes into fall. It occurs naturally in upland hardwood forests, slope forests and bluffs, and is pollinated by hummingbirds as well as other insects. There are approximately 60 species of Spigelia that occur from the southern US south to Argentina. Only four species are native to Florida.

Carolina redroot (Lacnanthes caroliana). Photo by Chris Waltz

Flower Friday: Carolina redroot

Carolina redroot is a perennial herbaceous wildflower that blooms from summer into fall. It occurs naturally in wet flatwoods, marshes, bogs, dome swamps, savannas and coastal swales. Its blooms are attractive to a variety of butterflies and moths; its seeds are eaten by birds; and the whole plant is favored by feral hogs, who are known to dig up and eat large patches of redroot.

Chris delivers his pollinator pots to FWF staff.

Create a pollinator garden in a pot!

Chris Waltz, volunteer extraordinaire and wildflower-gardening enthusiast, was inspired by people saying they can’t grow natives because they live in an apartment, condo, or other small space. He started thinking: They grow houseplants and annuals; why can’t they grow natives the same way? The result? A “pollinator garden in a pot.”

Gopher apple (Licania michauxii). Photo by Chris Waltz

Flower Friday: Gopher apple

Gopher apple is a hardy, low-growing, woody perennial shrub that occurs naturally in sandhills, pine flatwoods, scrubby flatwoods and scrub. It is often confused with runner oak, which has a similar growth habit and is found in similar habitats. Gopher apple can bloom year-round.

White birds-in-a-nest (Macbridea alba) Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: White birds-in-a-nest

White birds-in-a-nest is a Florida endemic perennial wildflower that blooms May through July. It is fire-dependent and occurs naturally in coastal pinelands, seeps, and wet savannas. It is a state-listed endangered species and a US-listed threatened species. White birds-in-a-nest gets its common name from the way its white flowers and buds resemble bird heads and eggs nestled within a green nest that is formed by the flower’s bracts.

LIzard's tail (Saururus cernuus). Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Lizard’s tail

Lizard’s tail is a perennial aquatic wildflower. Its tiny, white blooms are borne in early spring through summer and attract a variety of pollinators. They are also eaten by foraging ducks such as wood ducks. Both the common and genus name refer to the flower’s resemblance to a lizard’s tail.

Manyflower beardtongue (Penstemon multifloras). Photo by Eleanor Dietrich

Flower Friday: Manyflower beardtongue

Manyflower beardtongue (also known as white beardtongue) is a deciduous perennial wildflower with showy white flowers. The common name “beardtongue” refers to the tendency of blooms within the Penstemon genus to have a long, often hairy filament that protrudes from the mouth of the corolla, giving the appearance of a fuzzy tongue.

Parrot pitcherplant (Sarracenia psittacine). Photo by Eleanor Dietrich

Flower Friday: Parrot pitcherplant

Parrot pitcherplant is a carnivorous perennial plant. It typically flowers in April and May and occurs naturally in seepage slopes, wet prairies, depression marshes, dome swamps, and bogs. Parrot pitcherplant is a state listed threatened species. Its species name psittacine means “of or relating to parrots” and refers to the shape of the flower resembling the head of a parrot.

Fetterbush (Lyonia lucida) Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Fetterbush

Fetterbush (also known as shiny lyonia) is an erect woody evergreen shrub that produces a plethora of small, fragrant blooms in whitish-pink to pink to red. It occurs naturally in pine and scrubby flatwoods, scrub, dry hammocks, dry prairies, and along swamp and cypress pond margins.