Assessing Potential Loss of Coreopsis leavenworthii Genetic Diversity under Commercial Seed Production and Gene Flow from Coreopsis tinctoria.

The objectives of this project are to assess (1) the potential loss of genetic diversity (or genetic shift) during seed production of C. leavenworthii, and (2) potential gene flow from C.tinctoria to C. leavenworthii, two important issues in production and use of C. leavenworthii seeds. We have made excellent progress toward these objectives and have…

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Interspecific Hybridization between Coreopsis leavenworthii and Coreopsis tinctoria Differently Affected Growth, Development, and Reproduction of Their Progeny

The genus Coreopsis L. is Florida’s state wildflower; there is a strong interest in commercial production and large-scale planting of Coreopsis seed in Florida, especially the seed of Coreopsis leavenworthi Torr. & A. Gray (COLE) and Coreopsis tinctoria Nutt. (COTI). Both species belong to the same section [Calliopsis (Reichenb.) Nutt.] within Coreopsis and were known…

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Wildflower Tag

New look for the State Wildflower plate! Get yours today! The State Wildflower license plate received a facelift in October 2018. It’s still the same plate, working hard for native, natural Florida! Since its launch in 2000, it’s has raised more than $4.2 million for Florida’s native wildflowers, wildlife and wild places. The plate provides…

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Attracting Birds with Florida’s Native Wildflowers

Northern Parula on Coreopsis by Christina Evans View brochure Wildflowers for Nectar Hummingbird on Standing cypress (Ipomopsis rubra) by Peg Urban Hummingbirds gather nectar from wildflowers with tubular flowers. Many flowers produce fruit that other birds will eat. Coral honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) Wild columbine (Aquigelia canadensis) Firebush (Hamelia patens) Cardinalflower (Lobelia cardinalis) Beardtongue (Penstemon species)…

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It’s not a garden, it’s a habitat

Ecologists estimate that only 3 to 4 percent of land in the United States has been undisturbed by human activity. That’s why providing habitat — food, shelter and nesting areas for wildlife — within sustainable urban landscapes should be an important goal for everyone.

We can’t create a perfect natural habitat for each species. However, we can make a difference by using Florida’s native wildflowers and plants. Learn how!