Working for wildflowers

Funds from the State Wildflower license plate grow wildflowers for bees and butterflies. Get yours today!

State Wildflower license plate

Pollinator pathways

Wildflowers provide valuable habitat for bees and butterflies along highways. Learn how you can help protect roadside wildflowers.

Experience wild places

The Foundation provides educational opportunities through field trips. Join our e-news list to learn more.

Feed the bees

The Foundation funds research that is helping pollinators thrive, now and in the future. Learn more.

Photo by John Moran

The Florida Wildflower Foundation protects, connects and expands native wildflower habitats through education, planting, conservation and research.

Lake County, FWF partner to create pollinator habitat

Bees and butterflies, including Monarchs, have 3 acres of new native habitat, thanks to Lake County Parks and Trails and the Florida Wildflower Foundation, which have partnered to develop pollinator habitat along the multiuse Neighborhood Lakes Scenic Trail north of Orlando.

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Blanketflower bloom

Blanketflower – native or not?

Recent research found that Gaillardia pulchella is not a native Florida species, but rather an introduced species. The news sparked many different reactions across the state. Experts weigh in on what this means for Florida gardeners.

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Nancy Bissett

Webinar: 20 Easy-to-Grow Wildflowers

In this webinar, Nancy Bissett will present easy-to-grow native wildflowers that attract a variety of butterflies and other pollinators essential to Florida’s natural health. Nancy will cover detailed descriptions of each plant, including its flowering, seeding and growing conditions, such as light, moisture and soil needs.

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Great purple hairstreak (Atlides halesus) on Butterweed (Packera glabella)by Mary Keim

Know your native pollinators: Great purple hairstreak

The Great purple hairstreak is a relatively large butterfly that can often be found in oak hammocks, home to their larval host Oak mistletoe (Phoradendron leucarpum). Oddly, Great purple hairstreaks can be identified by the iridescent blue, not purple, on the upper side of their wings.    

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What’s in bloom

See how Florida’s fabulous wildflowers change seasonably across the state. You’ll find just what you need to be a wildflower tourist, whether you’re on the road or a virtual explorer.

Feay’s prairieclover

Feay’s prairieclover (Dalea feayi) is a near-endemic shrub found in sandhills and scrubby habitats of peninsular Florida. In late spring through early fall, the plant may be covered in hundreds of fluffy pink flower balls. These delightful blooms attract a variety of pollinators, especially native bees. Butterflies are not known to frequent the flowers, but the plant is a larval host for the Southern dogface. The seeds are eaten by birds and other wildlife.

Details

Drive change – help pollinators thrive!

Pollinators are responsible for every third bite we eat and the reproduction of 85 percent of the world’s plants and trees. But they are in trouble. Development of Florida’s natural lands has robbed them of the wildflowers they need to survive.

But there is good news: You can help save pollinators by purchasing the State Wildflower license plate. Each time a State Wildflower plate is bought or renewed, the Florida Wildflower Foundation receives $15 to support native wildflower planting, education and research projects statewide. The plate is the only dependable source of revenue for Florida’s wildflowers and plants.

Do your part to support natural Florida’s future – get your tag today.

Helping millions of Monarchs by researching the effects of neonicotinoids on caterpillars.

Providing more than 3,000 wildflower plants annually for community park and school gardens.

Providing hands-on wildflower experiences to more than 1,500 students a year.