The Florida Wildflower Foundation nurtures the awareness, understanding and enjoyment of Florida native wildflowers through conservation, preservation and education.

Many of Florida’s spring native wildflowers have large, showy flowers –– such as Iris and Purple thistle. But some common ones may be underappreciated because their flowers are small, near the ground, or just positioned on the stem where they may be hard to see. However, they are quite beautiful when viewed close up.

Registration is now open for the Florida Wildflower Symposium (rescheduled from September due to Hurricane Irma). Join us on April 27–28, 2018 at the Orange County UF/IFAS Extension on South Conway Road in Orlando for two days of field trips, hands-on workshops, educational presentations and more!

The Florida Wildflower Foundation is the worldwide ambassador of Florida’s native wildflowers.

FWF member takes action with plant give-away

What’s a wildflower gardener to do with those extra seedlings that pop up? Instead of pulling them like unwanted weeds, FWF member Jim McGinity decided to pay it forward. Using an idea reminiscent of a curbside lemonade stand, he repots the wee seedlings and offers them for free to neighbors and passers-by. Not only that, he uses them as welcome-to-the-neighborhood gifts for new residents. It’s an idea we love: What’s more neighborly than sharing the joy of wildflowers?

Details >

Celebrating 10 years of outstanding leadership

Non-profit executive directors tend to be exceptional people, but Lisa Roberts’ level of service has been extraordinary. This month we celebrate a decade of accomplishments under her watch. We also express our appreciation for her skill, poise and style. We are honored to have Lisa as the face of the Foundation.

Details >

It’s not a garden, it’s a habitat

Ecologists estimate that only 3 to 4 percent of land in the United States has been undisturbed by human activity. That’s why providing habitat — food, shelter and nesting areas for wildlife — within sustainable urban landscapes should be an important goal for everyone.

We can’t create a perfect natural habitat for each species. However, we can make a difference by using Florida’s native wildflowers and plants. Learn how!

Details >

Help feed the bees that feed us

Our bees are in trouble, and they need your help. You can plant and preserve wildflowers for bees by purchasing the State Wildflower license plate!

Each time the State Wildflower plate is purchased or renewed, the Florida Wildflower Foundation receives $15 to support native wildflower planting, education and research projects statewide. We depend on the tag to fund the majority of what we do for native, natural Florida. Make your switch now – purchase the tag.

found nowhere else in the world

of native bees in Florida

1 Million
with invasive exotic plants

Take action

The more you know about wildflowers, the more you’ll appreciate how they enrich our lives.

Young Floridians are learning about our state’s environment and creatures through classroom activities that introduce them to wildflowers and their places in healthy ecosystems. 

Grow native wildflowers

The Foundation is dedicated to discovering and sharing best practices for establishing native Florida wildflowers across our landscapes.

10 Easy Coverpledge_hand

What’s in bloom

See how Florida’s fabulous wildflowers change seasonably across the state. You’ll find just what you need to be a wildflower tourist, whether you’re on the road or a virtual explorer.


Flower Friday: Lewton’s milkwort

Lewton’s milkwort is a state-endangered wildflower endemic to only six counties in Central Florida. It occurs in scrub, sandhill and pine barren habitats where maintenance includes a regular fire regime. It blooms in late winter and spring, attracting a variety of pollinators, especially leafcutter bees, hover flies and bee flies.


Protect wildflowers

Want more wildflowers in your county? Learn about wildflower conservation programs and how they apply to your community. Be a wildflower champion!

Wildflower Resolutions

Since 2009, resolutions have been helping Florida’s counties and cities protect roadside wildflowers through management practices such as reduced mowing. Has your county adopted its Wildflower Resolution?

Details >

FDOT Wildflower Program

In November 2016, the Florida Department of Transportation updated its Wildflower Management Program Procedure to include managing roadsides for pollinator habitat.

Details >

Highway Wildflowers

The Highways Bettering the Economy and Environment Pollinator Protection Act (BEE Act) was adopted in December 2015 as part of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act). It calls for the conservation and planting of native habitat along highways that benefits wild and honey bees and butterflies.

Details >