Working for wildflowers

Funds from the State Wildflower license plate grow wildflowers for bees and butterflies. Get yours today!

State Wildflower license plate

Pollinator pathways

Wildflowers provide valuable habitat for bees and butterflies along highways. Learn how you can help protect roadside wildflowers.

Experience wild places

The Foundation provides educational opportunities through field trips. Join our e-news list to learn more.

Feed the bees

The Foundation funds research that is helping pollinators thrive, now and in the future. Learn more.

Photo by John Moran

The Florida Wildflower Foundation protects, connects and expands native wildflower habitats through education, planting, conservation and research.

CeraunusBlueButterfly (Hemiargus ceraunus) by Mary Keim

Know your native pollinators: Ceraunus blue

Ceraunus blue butterflies, found in the gossamer-winged family, fly in southern Florida throughout the year. The common name of these small butterflies comes from the violet blue of the male’s dorsal side. Females have a smaller amount of blue which is located on their dorsal side at the base of their wings. The larval hosts of the Ceraunus blue are plants in the Fabaceae family.    

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Viva Florida grant opens

The Foundation is now accepting applications for its Viva Florida Landscape Demonstration grant. The grants provide assistance to Florida parks, nature centers, county extension offices and other public spaces that wish to establish or augment wildflower demonstration gardens. Resulting gardens showcase the beauty and variety of Florida’s native wildflowers while demonstrating their use in conventional landscapes.

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Drs. Pam and Doug Soltis

Webinar: Using Evolutionary History as a Tool for Plant Conservation

What will Florida’s ecosystems look and feel like in the future? Using herbarium records, scientists can predict how Florida’s native plants will react to our changing climate. In this free webinar, Drs. Pamela and Douglas Soltis will discuss how an “evolutionary tree” is being built with molecular samples from herbarium collections to predict Florida’s natural future.

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Garden with blooming tropical sage

Webinar: Viva Florida grant program

Thinking of applying for a Viva Florida Landscape Demonstration Garden grant? Want to know more about the program? This recorded webinar will introduce you to the program’s eligibility, project and budget requirements and show examples of successful Viva Florida-funded projects.

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What’s in bloom

See how Florida’s fabulous wildflowers change seasonably across the state. You’ll find just what you need to be a wildflower tourist, whether you’re on the road or a virtual explorer.

Yellow rabbitbells flower

Rabbitbells

Rabbitbells (Crotalaria rotundifolia) is a low-growing wildflower found in pinelands, sandhills and disturbed sandy areas throughout Florida. Its small yellow flowers bloom throughout the year, attracting mostly bees. The unassuming plant often goes unnoticed as its flowers do not open until the afternoon and remain open only for one day. Of the 15 species of Crotalaria that occur in Florida, only four are native. Rabbitbells is the most common and widespread of the native species.

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State Wildflower license plate

Drive change – help pollinators thrive!

Pollinators are responsible for every third bite we eat and the reproduction of 85 percent of the world’s plants and trees. But they are in trouble. Development of Florida’s natural lands has robbed them of the wildflowers they need to survive.

But there is good news: You can help save pollinators by purchasing the State Wildflower license plate. Each time a State Wildflower plate is bought or renewed, the Florida Wildflower Foundation receives $15 to support native wildflower planting, education and research projects statewide. The plate is the only dependable source of revenue for Florida’s wildflowers and plants.

Do your part to support natural Florida’s future – get your tag today.

Helping millions of Monarchs by researching the effects of neonicotinoids on caterpillars.

Providing more than 3,000 wildflower plants annually for community park and school gardens.

Providing hands-on wildflower experiences to more than 1,500 students a year.