Working for wildflowers

Funds from the State Wildflower license plate grow wildflowers for bees and butterflies. Get yours today!

State Wildflower license plate

Pollinator pathways

Wildflowers provide valuable habitat for bees and butterflies along highways. Learn how you can help protect roadside wildflowers.

Experience wild places

The Foundation provides educational opportunities through field trips. Join our e-news list to learn more.

Feed the bees

The Foundation funds research that is helping pollinators thrive, now and in the future. Learn more.

Photo by John Moran

 

The Florida Wildflower Foundation protects, connects and expands native wildflower habitats through education, planting, conservation and research.

 

Garden with blooming tropical sage

Webinar: Viva Florida grant program

Thinking of applying for a Viva Florida Landscape Demonstration Garden grant? Want to know more about the program? Join us at 2 p.m. on Dec. 2 for a free webinar to learn about the program’s eligibility, project and budget requirements and to see examples of successful Viva Florida-funded projects.

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Spiderwort flower

Webinar: Incredible edible natives

Did you know that many of Florida’s native plants are edible? Even some of those pesky “weeds” that pop up in our yards have culinary value. Watch “Incredible Edible Natives,” presented by FWF Program Manager Stacey Matrazzo, to learn about the edible, medicinal and nutritional properties of some native plants commonly found in our yards and landscapes.

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My spooky October wildflower garden

October started with a beautiful full moon, and in those hours when a wildflower gardener can’t sleep, she looks out the upstairs window over her dappled moonlit wildflower garden. It looks serene and scary at the same time!

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Tiger Creek

Environmental organizations say no to new toll roads

The Florida Wildflower Foundation has joined 109 other environmental organizations in signing a letter to the Florida Department of Transportation opposing the building of three new toll roads. The letter cites the failure of each proposed road’s task force to provide detailed comprehensive forecasts of future population, environmental and land use impacts, employment, traffic and usage rates.

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What’s in bloom

See how Florida’s fabulous wildflowers change seasonably across the state. You’ll find just what you need to be a wildflower tourist, whether you’re on the road or a virtual explorer.

Bee on purple aster flower

Georgia aster

Georgia aster (Symphyotrichum georgianum) blooms in October and November and is a magnet for bees and butterflies. Its flowers are distinguishable from other Symphyotrichum species by their relatively large size (up to 2 inches in diameter) and deep violet-colored ray petals. In Florida, the plant occurs only in Leon County and is a state-listed threatened species. It is also found in a few counties in Alabama, Georgia and North and South Carolina. Habitat loss and fire suppression in its native pineland and savanna ecosystems have contributed significantly to its decline.

Details

State Wildflower license plate

Drive change – help pollinators thrive!

Pollinators are responsible for every third bite we eat and the reproduction of 85 percent of the world’s plants and trees. But they are in trouble. Development of Florida’s natural lands has robbed them of the wildflowers they need to survive.

But there is good news: You can help save pollinators by purchasing the State Wildflower license plate. Each time a State Wildflower plate is bought or renewed, the Florida Wildflower Foundation receives $15 to support native wildflower planting, education and research projects statewide. The plate is the only dependable source of revenue for Florida’s wildflowers and plants.

Do your part to support natural Florida’s future – get your tag today.

Helping millions of Monarchs by researching the effects of neonicotinoids on caterpillars.

Providing more than 3,000 wildflower plants annually for community park and school gardens.

Providing hands-on wildflower experiences to more than 1,500 students a year.