The Florida Wildflower Foundation nurtures the awareness, understanding and enjoyment of Florida native wildflowers through conservation, preservation and education.

Weedy roadside planting

Research tackles the issue of weed seeds in soil banks

The Florida Wildflower Foundation will begin a four-year project to evaluate economical and practical site preparation methods to minimize weed competition in wildflower sites planted from seeds, hoping to discover methods that lead to greater planting success.The project at Lake County’s Palatlakaha Environmental and Agricultural Reserve (PEAR) Park will be conducted in partnership with the county with cooperation from the Florida Industrial and Phosphate Research Institute at Florida Polytechnic University.

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Seedlings for Schools garden

Wildflower gardens to flourish at 33 schools across Florida

The Florida Wildflower Foundation has awarded 2018 Seedlings for Schools grants to 33 schools in 18 counties across the state. Each grant includes wildflower plants, expert guidance from the Foundation, and curriculum resources, including the Foundation’s Wild About Wildflowers! Activity Guide. Teachers will receive plants in the fall and will be eligible to receive more plants in spring 2019 if their fall gardens are successful.

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Hibiscus bee (Ptilothrix bombiformis) by Jonathan Bremer

Know your native pollinators: Chimney bees

Chimney bees like the Mustached mud and Hibiscus bees are solitary ground nesters that have serious architectural talent! Both bees superficially resemble bumblebees in appearance. They’re fast flying, robust bees with dense yellow hairs on their thorax. (Hibiscus bees also have yellow hairs on their face.)

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What’s in bloom

See how Florida’s fabulous wildflowers change seasonably across the state. You’ll find just what you need to be a wildflower tourist, whether you’re on the road or a virtual explorer.

Flower Friday: Starrush whitetop

Starrush whitetop is a unique and long-lived perennial sedge. It is known (and named) for its striking bracts that are often mistaken for a daisy-like flower. It occurs naturally in wet flatwoods, wet prairies, swales and roadside ditches. Like most sedges, starrush whitetop stems are triangular. But unlike most sedges and other grass-like species, which are wind-pollinated, starrush whitetop is pollinated by insects that are attracted to the showy bracts.

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Help feed the bees that feed us

Our bees are in trouble, and they need your help. You can plant and preserve wildflowers for bees by purchasing the State Wildflower license plate!

Each time the State Wildflower plate is purchased or renewed, the Florida Wildflower Foundation receives $15 to support native wildflower planting, education and research projects statewide. We depend on the tag to fund the majority of what we do for native, natural Florida. Make your switch now – purchase the tag.

Helping millions of Monarchs by researching the effects of neonicotinoids on caterpillars.

Providing more than 3,000 wildflower plants annually for community park and school gardens.

Providing hands-on wildflower experiences to more than 1,500 students a year.

Take action

The more you know about wildflowers, the more you’ll appreciate how they enrich our lives.

Protect wildflowers

Want more wildflowers in your county? Learn about wildflower conservation programs and how they apply to your community. Be a wildflower champion!

Wildflower Resolutions

Since 2009, resolutions have been helping Florida’s counties and cities protect roadside wildflowers through management practices such as reduced mowing. Has your county adopted its Wildflower Resolution?

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FDOT Wildflower Program

In November 2016, the Florida Department of Transportation updated its Wildflower Management Program Procedure to include managing roadsides for pollinator habitat.

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Paths of Sunshine

In a first for Florida, a project to manage naturally occurring wildflowers – versus displays that have been planted – has been recognized for its success.

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