Working for wildflowers

Funds from the State Wildflower license plate grow wildflowers for bees and butterflies. Get yours today!

State Wildflower license plate

Pollinator pathways

Wildflowers provide valuable habitat for bees and butterflies along highways. Learn how you can help protect roadside wildflowers.

Experience wild places

The Foundation provides educational opportunities through field trips. Join our e-news list to learn more.

Feed the bees

The Foundation funds research that is helping pollinators thrive, now and in the future. Learn more.

Photo by John Moran

The Florida Wildflower Foundation protects, connects and expands native wildflower habitats through education, planting, conservation and research.

Pickerelweed, Pontederia cordata

Spring wildflowers in District 1

Drought may develop over the next few months from North Central Florida to South Florida, according to the Climate Prediction Center, so the time is now for spring wildflower viewing. Look for the best native wildflower displays in wet areas and shallow water.

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Dick Bush

In memory: Dick Bush

Our wildflower family has lost a dear friend. Dick Bush, the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) District 2 wildflower coordinator until his retirement in 2015, passed away on Feb. 24. He gave his all to the job he loved, and roadsides from Nassau to Levy counties showed it. In 2015, the Foundation gave Dick its Coreopsis Award – its highest honor – in recognition of his lifetime of service of Florida, its environment and its wildflowers.

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Children planting wildflowers

Apply now for school garden grants

The Florida Wildflower Foundation’s Seedlings for School program is now accepting applications for campus wildflower garden grants. Public and private pre-K to 12-grade schoolteachers may apply to receive a grant.

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Janice Broda

Member profile: Janice Broda

Get to know Florida Wildflower Foundation member Janice Broda. Janice has been attending Foundation field trips, symposiums and webinars regularly since 2014. Exceptionally active in her community, she has served on the board of directors of the Indian River Mosquito Control District for nearly 30 years and is a founding member of her Florida Native Plant Society (FNPS) chapter. Janice currently coordinates the Volunteer Nature Stewardship Program for the Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory.

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What’s in bloom

See how Florida’s fabulous wildflowers change seasonably across the state. You’ll find just what you need to be a wildflower tourist, whether you’re on the road or a virtual explorer.

Florida scrub roseling, Callisia ornata

Flower Friday: Florida scrub roseling

Florida scrub roseling (Callisia ornata) is a beautiful and delicate wildflower endemic to Florida, where it occurs in sandhill and scrub habitats. It typically blooms spring through fall and attracts a variety of pollinators — especially bees. A member of the dayflower family, the plant is a close relative of (and its blooms look very similar to) Tradescantia and Commelina species. And like these species, the Florida scrub roseling flower is ephemeral, meaning it opens in the morning and closes by early afternoon.

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State Wildflower license plate

Drive change – help pollinators thrive!

Pollinators are responsible for every third bite we eat and the reproduction of 85 percent of the world’s plants and trees. But they are in trouble. Development of Florida’s natural lands has robbed them of the wildflowers they need to survive.

But there is good news: You can help save pollinators by purchasing the State Wildflower license plate. Each time a State Wildflower plate is bought or renewed, the Florida Wildflower Foundation receives $15 to support native wildflower planting, education and research projects statewide. The plate is the only dependable source of revenue for Florida’s wildflowers and plants.

Do your part to support natural Florida’s future – get your tag today.

Helping millions of Monarchs by researching the effects of neonicotinoids on caterpillars.

Providing more than 3,000 wildflower plants annually for community park and school gardens.

Providing hands-on wildflower experiences to more than 1,500 students a year.