Working for wildflowers

Funds from the State Wildflower license plate grow wildflowers for bees and butterflies. Get yours today!

State Wildflower license plate

Pollinator pathways

Wildflowers provide valuable habitat for bees and butterflies along highways. Learn how you can help protect roadside wildflowers.

Wildflowers at home

Using native wildflowers and plants? Earn recognition for your landscape through the "Wildflowers, Naturally!" program.

Experience wild places

The Foundation provides educational opportunities through field trips. Join our e-news list to learn more.

Feed the bees

The Foundation funds research that is helping pollinators thrive, now and in the future. Learn more.

Photo by John Moran

 

The Florida Wildflower Foundation protects, connects and expands native wildflower habitats through education, planting, conservation and research.

 

Pipevine swallowtail on Butterflyweed, Asclepias tuberosa

Know your native pollinators: Pipevine swallowtail

This charming swallowtail butterfly is easily distinguishable by the iridescent blue shimmer glowing from the hindwing when wings are open, and the orange spots and blue background on the hindwing when the wings are closed. Wings are black aside from these splashes of color.    

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Native plant home landscape

Webinar: Native Plants for Florida Gardens

Learn how to take the guesswork out of using native plants in urban settings in our free webinar, “Native Plants for Florida Gardens,” on Aug. 5. featuring Stacey Matrazzo, FWF program manager and co-author of Native Plants for Florida Gardens. In her presentation, Stacey will highlight a selection of species and discuss how to use them to transform your landscape into a living ecosystem with “real Florida” style.

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Yellow wildflowers blooming in raised bed

35 schools win wildflower garden grants

Thirty-five schools in 17 counties have been awarded 2020 Seedlings for Schools (SFS) grants. The grants give pre-K to high school teachers wildflower plants, personal gardening guidance and online teaching resources. Teachers are expected to receive plants in September, when schools are expected to reopen in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

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Cloudless sulphur butterfly on Heart-leaf brickell-bush flower

Webinar: Creating Pollinator Pathways

Learn about creating pollinator pathways in the built environment during a free webinar on July 7 featuring Dr. Jaret Daniels, who will explain how every landscape, large and small, is now critical to supporting the biodiversity that keeps our ecosystems functioning.

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What’s in bloom

See how Florida’s fabulous wildflowers change seasonably across the state. You’ll find just what you need to be a wildflower tourist, whether you’re on the road or a virtual explorer.

Bay bean flowers

Flower Friday: Bay bean

Also known as Seaside bean, beach bean, coastal jackbean and Mackenzie bean, Bay bean (Canavalia rosea) is a sprawling, mat-forming vine. It occurs naturally in coastal strands and on dunes where it helps control erosion by stabilizing the sand. It blooms year-round, peaking in summer and fall. The flowers attract a variety of insects, but are primarily pollinated by bees.

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State Wildflower license plate

Drive change – help pollinators thrive!

Pollinators are responsible for every third bite we eat and the reproduction of 85 percent of the world’s plants and trees. But they are in trouble. Development of Florida’s natural lands has robbed them of the wildflowers they need to survive.

But there is good news: You can help save pollinators by purchasing the State Wildflower license plate. Each time a State Wildflower plate is bought or renewed, the Florida Wildflower Foundation receives $15 to support native wildflower planting, education and research projects statewide. The plate is the only dependable source of revenue for Florida’s wildflowers and plants.

Do your part to support natural Florida’s future – get your tag today.

Helping millions of Monarchs by researching the effects of neonicotinoids on caterpillars.

Providing more than 3,000 wildflower plants annually for community park and school gardens.

Providing hands-on wildflower experiences to more than 1,500 students a year.