Wildflower Newsletter

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WILDFLOWERS in the Media

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Florida Wildflower Foundation News

Now blooming: Swamp azalea

Date Posted: May 27, 2016

Another great Florida native for shady landscapes is swamp azalea (Rhododendron viscosum). Its beautiful blooms are sweetly fragrant and attract many pollinators, including hummingbirds. It occurs naturally in wet flatwoods, seep and bay swamps and along lake margins.

The genus Rhododendron comes from the Greek rhodon, or “rose,” and dendron, or “tree.” The species viscosum refers to the viscous glands that occur on the flower tube.

This photo was taken by Stacey Matrazzo in the Ocala National Forest.

Learn more about Florida's only white-flowering and summer-blooming azalea on our blog.

Now blooming: Southern beeblossom

Date Posted: May 20, 2016

Southern beeblossom (Oenothera simulans) is an erect herbaceous annual that produces wandlike spikes of fuzzy, reddish-pink buds that open in the evening as delicate white four-petaled blossoms. They turn pink the following day and then wither away.

Southern beeblossom occurs naturally along roadsides and in pinelands, open woods and sandy fields. It flowers spring through summer and attracts a wide range of small pollinators, including moths and bees. Its flowers open at night (hence the family name, evening primrose), so only pollinators that forage at night can pollinate them. Birds have been known to eat Southern beeblossom seeds.

Read more about this night bloomer on our blog.

Now blooming: Pricklypear cactus

Date Posted: May 11, 2016

The bright yellow flowers of pricklypear cactus attract a wide range of pollinators, especially native bees. The fleshy fruits and seeds are eaten by birds, small mammals and gopher tortoises (who also enjoy browsing the pads).

Pricklypear cactus fruits and young pads are also edible to humans (once they have been carefully de-bristled). The ripe fruits can be eaten raw or used to make juice, jam or syrup. The pads or nopales can be sautéed or grilled.

Read more about this spinose succulent on our blog.

Photo by Stacey Matrazzo.

Now blooming: Mock bishopsweed

Date Posted: May 06, 2016

Mock bishopsweed (Ptilimnium capillaceum) is a delicate little annual that is too often disregarded as a weed. But despite its small stature, it is both attractive and ecologically beneficial, especially when it occurs in mass. Its many dainty white flowers are born in compound umbels that are encircled at their base by threadlike bracts. Though the flowers are tiny, the nectar is easily accessible to many pollinators, including flies and wasps. It is also the larval host plant for the black swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes) butterfly.

Learn all about mock bishopsweed on our blog.

Photo by: Stacey Matrazzo.

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June 25: Native Florida Landscapes

All the News

May 27, 2016Now blooming: Swamp azalea

May 20, 2016Now blooming: Southern beeblossom

May 11, 2016Now blooming: Pricklypear cactus

May 06, 2016Now blooming: Mock bishopsweed

May 03, 2016Double your impact for natural Florida during National Wildflower Week

Apr 29, 2016Now blooming: Blue eyed grass

Apr 21, 2016Now blooming: False indigo

Apr 14, 2016Now blooming: White wild indigo

Apr 07, 2016Now blooming: Fringetree

Apr 04, 2016Wildflower Farm Field Day and Photography Workshop

Mar 31, 2016Now blooming: Mountain laurel

Mar 24, 2016Now blooming: Lanceleaf tickseed

Mar 16, 2016It was a great year for wildflowers!

Mar 16, 2016Now blooming: Eastern redbud

Mar 10, 2016Now blooming: Black titi

Mar 04, 2016Now blooming: Wild blue phlox

Mar 12, 2016New Coreopsis species

Feb 29, 2016Spring Wildflower Tour of SR 65

Feb 26, 2016Now blooming: Rue anemone

Feb 18, 2016Now blooming: Yellow butterwort

Feb 12, 2016Now blooming: Four petal St. John's wort

Feb 10, 2016Panhandle Wildflower Alliance to meet

Feb 05, 2016Now blooming: Sandhill wireweed

Jan 29, 2016Now blooming: Tread softly

Jan 22, 2016Now blooming: False rosemary

Jan 15, 2016Now blooming: Coastalplain goldenaster

Dec 11, 2015Tour Orlando Wetlands Park With FWF

Dec 11, 2015Moran photo exhibit finds permanent home

Jun 24, 201528 Seeds for Schools grants announced

Mar 26, 2015Pinellas 'Viva Florida' wildflower landscape demonstrates use of native plants

Mar 17, 2015Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center to host FWF scientific literature database

Feb 03, 2015Download our winter newsletter

The Florida Wildflower Foundation is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization; contributions are tax deductible. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION FOR THE FLORIDA WILDFLOWER FOUNDATION, A FLORIDA-BASED NONPROFIT CORPORATION (REGISTRATION NO. CH12319), MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE 1-800-HELP-FLA (435-7352) WITHIN THE STATE OR VISITING THEIR WEBSITE HERE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE.