Wildflower Newsletter

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WILDFLOWERS in the Media

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Florida Wildflower Foundation News

Now blooming: Sandhill wireweed

Date Posted: Feb 05, 2016

Also known as largeflower jointweed, sandhill wireweed is a deciduous woody shrub that produces an abundance of spike-like flowering clusters.

Sandhill wireweed is mostly a summer and fall bloomer, with October being its most abundant blooming time, but many of these plants were blossoming last weekend at Allen David Broussard Catfish Creek Preserve State Park in Polk County. It occurs naturally in dunes, scrub and sandhills, and is primarily pollinated by bees. Its seeds are eaten by birds.

Sandhill wireweed is endemic to Florida. It occurs nowhere else in the world.

The genus name Polygonella (as well as the family name Polygonaceae) is derived from the Greek words poly, meaning “many” and goni, meaning “knee or joint.” This refers to the swollen nodes that many of the species in the family possess.

Read more about sandhill wireweed on our blog.

Photo/Stacey Matrazzo.

Now blooming: Tread softly

Date Posted: Jan 29, 2016

Tread-softly's common name is also a warning to heedless handlers. As its name suggests, one must tread softly around it or else risk being stung by the many stinging hairs that cover its leaves, stems, seeds and even flowers. The hairs contain an irritant that can cause a rash in some people. Despite its stinging hairs and its inclusion in the spurge family, tread-softly is not a true nettle. It does, however, produce the milky sap common to other members of the Euphorbiaceae family.

It’s easy to see how tread-softly gets its common name, and its scientific name is just as telling. The genus Cnidoscolus is derived from the Greek cnid, meaning “nettle” and scolus, meaning “thorn.” The species epithet comes from the Latin stimul, meaning “to goad, prod or urge,” as in a “stimulus.”

Tread-softly is known to flower year-round. It occurs naturally in sandhills, scrub, pine and scrubby flatwoods, and ruderal and disturbed areas. It attracts many butterflies and other pollinators.

Read more about tread-softly on our blog.

Edible Native Walk at PEAR Park

Date Posted: Jan 20, 2016

Join the Florida Wildflower Foundation for an interactive edible plant walk at Lake County's PEAR Park on Saturday, March 5 from 10 a.m. until noon.

Stacey Matrazzo, FWF program manager, will lead us on a leisurely walk, on which we will taste, touch and smell some of the native plants growing in PEAR Park's native plant demonstration garden. Learn which are edible, which have medicinal properties and which have cultural and historical importance.

Palatlakaha Environmental and Agricultural Reserve (PEAR) Park Nature Center and Wildlife Conservation Area is a "passive” recreation area with several miles of trails to explore, a beautiful new bird blind and native plant demonstration landscape, ephemeral wetlands, xeric and butterfly demonstration gardens, 50 acres of scrub jay restoration, five acres of meadow restoration and much more. Bordered on two sides by the Palatlakaha River, this area holds a vast amount of wildlife and plants for the avid birder or naturalist to discover.

The field trip will begin at 10 a.m. and will last approximately 2 hours. Bring your cameras and binoculars and allow some time after the plant walk to explore the rest of the park.

This event is free for FWF members; the cost for non-members is $15. For more information and to register, click here.

Now blooming: False rosemary

Date Posted: Jan 22, 2016

False rosemary (Conradina canescens) is an aromatic and robust, evergreen flowering shrub. It typically blooms from March through November, but can occur year-round. (A population in Topsail Hill Preserve State Park in Santa Rosa County was flowering last weekend.) It occurs naturally in sand pine scrub and sandhills.

Many pollinator species are attracted to false rosemary, but bees are the most prominent visitor.

There are only six species of Conradina worldwide; all are native to the United States and four are native to Florida. (Some experts consider Conradina brevifolia to be its own species, but the Atlas of Florida Vascular Plants considers it a synonym of Conradina canescens.)

Read more about false rosemary on our blog

Photo/Wayne Matchett

News Button

All the News

Feb 05, 2016Now blooming: Sandhill wireweed

Jan 29, 2016Now blooming: Tread softly

Jan 20, 2016Edible Native Walk at PEAR Park

Jan 22, 2016Now blooming: False rosemary

Jan 15, 2016Now blooming: Coastalplain goldenaster

Dec 11, 2015Tour Orlando Wetlands Park With FWF

Dec 11, 2015Moran photo exhibit finds permanent home

Jun 24, 201528 Seeds for Schools grants announced

Mar 26, 2015Pinellas 'Viva Florida' wildflower landscape demonstrates use of native plants

Mar 17, 2015Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center to host FWF scientific literature database

Feb 03, 2015Download our winter newsletter

May 30, 2014FDOT study: Roadside ecosystem services valued at more than 1/2 billion dollars

May 05, 2014Take the Wildflower & Native Plant Pledge

Feb 27, 2014FWF releases 2012-13 Annual Report

Feb 06, 2014FDOT adopts new wildflower program

Jan 06, 2014Download our Winter 2014 newsletter

Dec 31, 2013FWF board signs Clean Water Declaration

Dec 23, 2013Jan. 28 meeting in Tallahassee to review FDOT Wildflower and Natural Areas Program

Oct 30, 2013Download our Fall newsletter

Aug 08, 2013FWF awards 25 planting grants

Jul 30, 2013Dietrich to serve as FWF liaison between FDOT, Panhandle Wildflower Alliance

Jul 09, 2013Our summer newsletter is here!

Jun 25, 2013Despite veto, it's business as usual

Jun 13, 2013Join us at the 2013 Florida Wildflower Symposium

Mar 19, 2013Download our spring newsletter

Jan 31, 2013View our 2011-12 Annual Report

Jan 02, 2013Download our winter newsletter

Dec 20, 2012Moran exhibit to launch in Mount Dora

Nov 06, 2012FDOT, Panhandle Wildflower Alliance work together for Florida wildflowers

Oct 18, 2012Download our fall newsletter

Oct 05, 2012Join the Florida Wildflower Foundation in commemorating 500 years of La Florida

Aug 02, 2012Panhandle Alliance holds first meeting

Jun 20, 201213 La Florida community planting grants awarded in 11 counties

Jun 18, 20122012-13 Seeds for Schools grants awarded

Jun 06, 20127 counties, Live Oak pledge to conserve native wildflowers on roadsides

The Florida Wildflower Foundation is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization; contributions are tax deductible. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION FOR THE FLORIDA WILDFLOWER FOUNDATION, A FLORIDA-BASED NONPROFIT CORPORATION (REGISTRATION NO. CH12319), MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE 1-800-HELP-FLA (435-7352) WITHIN THE STATE OR VISITING THEIR WEBSITE HERE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE.