Skyblue clustervine (Jacquemontia pentanthos). Photo by Jason Hollinger (Creative Commons license)

Flower Friday: Skyblue clustervine

Skyblue clustervine is an evergreen, twining vine and is endangered in Florida. It is also known as Key West morning-glory, and occurs naturally in coastal hammocks and along wetlands in South Florida. It attracts a variety of pollinators, including the nessus sphinx (Amphion floridensis), tantalus sphinx (Aellopus tantalus) and tersa sphinx (Xylophanes tersa) moths, which pollinate the flowers at dusk.

Flower Friday: Hammock snakeroot

Hammock snakeroot is yet another member of the Eupatorieae tribe of the Aster family, which means its flowers consist of only disk and no ray florets. It flowers in summer through early winter and occurs naturally in pine flatwoods, sandhills, hammocks, upland mixed woodlands, and along roadsides and stream banks. Flowers are attractive to a variety of bees, butterflies and birds, but the plant is poisonous to both humans and livestock if ingested.

Climbing aster (Symphyotrichum carolinianum). Photo by Mary Keim

Flower Friday: Climbing aster

Climbing aster is a robust vine-like shrub that produces many fragrant daisy-like blooms of lavender to pinkish or even bluish. It occurs naturally in floodplain swamps and marshes, in coastal hammocks and wet pine flatwoods, and along riverbanks and lake edges, and is an excellent nectar source for many butterflies and bees.

Drumheads (Polygala cruciata). Photo by Wayne Matchett.

Flower Friday: Drumheads

Drumheads is a low-growing wildflower that blooms from late spring through fall. They occur naturally throughout most of Florida in wet pinelands, savannas and other open wetland habitats, as well as along marsh edges. The name Polygala comes from the Greek polys, which means “many or much,” and gala, which means “milk.” It is so-named because it was once believed that the presence of Polygala species in cow fields would result in higher milk production.

Garberia (Garberia heterophylla). Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Garberia

Garberia is a member of the Eupatorieae tribe of the Aster family, whose members produce flowers consisting of only disk and no ray florets. It is unlike most Aster species in that its growth habit is woody and shrubby rather than herbaceous. It is endemic to Florida’s north and central peninsula, and occurs naturally in scrub and xeric hammocks. It is a state-listed threatened species.

Forked blue curls (Trichostema dichotomum). Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Forked bluecurls

Forked bluecurls is an herbaceous to woody annual that bears dainty yet distinctive bluish-purple blooms. Flowers are short-lived, opening only in the morning, but individual plants may produce thousands of flowers throughout a season. It also has a particularly long flowering season, typically beginning in late summer and lasting through late fall.

Corn snakeroot (Eryngium snakeroot). Photo by Stacey Matrazzo.

Flower Friday: Corn snakeroot

Corn snakeroot blooms vary in color from rich lavender to a pale cornflower blue. They are globular and are surrounded by spiny bracts. They typically bloom summer through late fall, attracting a variety of pollinators. The common name snakeroot (also known as rattlesnakemaster, both of which are used to describe the Eryngium genus) may have come from its use in Native American culture as a remedy for snakebite.

Frostweed (Verbesina virginica). Photo by Mary Keim

Flower Friday: Frostweed

Frostweed is a robust, herbaceous perennial wildflower that bears clusters of white flowers with noticeably contrasting purplish-black anthers. It typically flowers late summer through fall along moist forest and hammock edges throughout the state. It is attractive to many bees, butterflies and other pollinators.

Narrowleaf yellowtops (Flaveria linearis). Photo by Mary Keim

Flower Friday: Narrowleaf yellowtops

Narrowleaf yellowtops is a perennial, low-growing herbaceous shrub that produces many bright yellow flowers that are attractive to a plethora of butterflies, bees and flower beetles. It occurs naturally in Florida’s depression and basin marshes, wet prairies, pine rocklands, hydric hammocks, mangrove swamp and tidal marsh edges, and in disturbed or ruderal areas.

Purple passionflower (Passiflora incarnata). Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Passionflower

Purple passionflower, also known as maypop, is an herbaceous, perennial vine that produces extraordinarily intricate purple-and-white-fringed flowers resembling something out of a Dr. Seuss book. It occurs naturally in open hammocks, along roadsides and in disturbed areas and is the larval host plant of several butterflies including the gulf fritillary and zebra longwing.