Elliotts-aster

Flower Friday: Elliott’s aster

Elliott’s aster is an herbaceous perennial wildflower that produces a coronet of lavender blooms. It typically flowers in late fall and occurs naturally in roadsides ditches, wet flatwoods, swamps, and marshes. It is a wonderful plant for attracting butterflies, bees and other pollinators due to its many fragrant blooms.

Saltbush (Baccharis halimifolia). Photo by Valorie Catalano

Flower Friday: Saltbush

Also known as groundsel tree and sea myrtle, saltbush is a long-lived perennial shrub that typically blooms in fall. It occurs naturally in coastal uplands and dunes, along pond margins, and in ditches and disturbed areas. It is an evergreen in the southern part of the state, but can be deciduous in northern Florida.

Lopsided indiangrass (Sorghastrum secundum) Photo by Katherine Edison

Flower Friday: Lopsided Indiangrass

Lopsided indiangrass is a robust and unique perennial bunchgrass. Throughout most of the year, it is rather indistinct. But in late summer, it produces tall, dramatic flower spikes. It occurs naturally in pinelands, sandhills and flatwoods. It is the larval host plant for the Delaware skipper, dusted skipper and swarthy skipper.

Honeycombhead (Balduina angustifolia) Photo by Mary Keim

Flower Friday: Honeycombhead

Coastalplain honeycombhead is an annual to biennial wildflower that produces showy, golden blooms that typically appear late spring or summer into fall. It occurs naturally in sandhills, scrub, dunes, and pine and scrubby flatwoods. It attracts a variety of butterflies, bees and other pollinators. Honeycombhead is also known as yellow buttons.

Lemon bacopa (Bacopa caroliniana) Photo by Eleanor Dietrich

Flower Friday: Lemon bacopa

Lemon bacopa (also known as blue waterhyssop) is a low-growing, mat-forming, perennial herbaceous wildflower that grows in very moist to aquatic habitats. It typically blooms late spring through fall, but can bloom year-round. It occurs naturally along pond and stream margins, and in swamps, marshes and shallow ditches. Its nectar is used by a variety of small pollinators.

Standing cypress (Ipomopsis rubra). Photo by Stacey Matrazzo

Flower Friday: Standing cypress

Standing cypress is a brilliant, biennial herbaceous wildflower. Contrary to its common name, it is not related to the cypress tree (Taxodium spp.). It blooms summer through fall and occurs naturally in sandhills, coastal strands, beach dunes and ruderal areas. It is very attractive to butterflies as well as other pollinators.

Thistleleaf aster (Eurybia eryngiifolia) Photo by Eleanor Dietrich

Flower Friday: Thistleleaf aster

Thistleleaf aster is an herbaceous perennial wildflower that occurs only in Florida’s eastern Panhandle and in a few neighboring counties in Alabama and Georgia. Its blooms are fairly large and appear in late spring through fall. It occurs naturally in wet prairies, wiregrass savannas and wet pine flatwoods and is loved by many bees and butterflies.