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Why native wildflowers?

Wildflowers do much more than give La Florida, the “land of flowers,” its unique sense of place.

Because they’ve adapted to Florida’s conditions and pests, they typically require less water, fertilizer and pesticides than other flowers. They also support myriad native wildlife, from bees to hummingbirds.
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Flower Friday Features Fabulous Florida Wildflowers

Each week, the Florida Wildflower Foundation's blog features a new native wildflower species profile on "Flower Friday." Visit the blog to learn all about our favorite species – their characteristics, growth habit, habitat, and garden tips. Each profile is accompanied by beautiful photography and sources of plant material.  

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  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image
  • Florida native wildflower image

No matter where you want wildflowers, this site has the information you need. Visit our page on Planting and Growing Wildflowers to learn how you can be successful in any setting.

Take a road trip!

Plan a trip in the Land of Flowers by seeing what's in bloom across the state. Our interactive gallery features all seasons and regions. Whether you go by car, bike or foot, our Website is your map and guide to the fabulous wildflowers of Florida

             Send us your pix!

Mobile App for the Wildflower Tourist

The Florida panhandle has the most significant, diverse and showy wildflower populations in the State. To plan your trip, and guide your travels, access the Easter Panhandle Wildflowers mobile website at http://flawildflowertrips.org.

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Now blooming: Sandhill wireweed

Also known as largeflower jointweed, sandhill wireweed (Polygonella robusta) is a deciduous woody shrub that produces an abundance of spike-like flowering clusters.

It is typically a summer and fall bloomer, with October being its most abundant blooming time, but many of these plants were blossoming last weekend at Allen David Broussard Catfish Creek Preserve State Park in Polk County.

Sandhill wireweed occurs naturally in dunes, scrub and sandhills, and is primarily pollinated by bees. Its seeds are eaten by birds. It is endemic to Florida, occurring nowhere else in the world.

Photo/Stacey Matrazzo.

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Now blooming: Tread softly

Tread-softly's common name is also a warning to heedless handlers. As its name suggests, one must tread softly around it or else risk being stung by the many stinging hairs that cover its leaves, stems, seeds and even flowers. The hairs contain an irritant that can cause a rash in some people.

It’s easy to see how tread-softly gets its common name, and its scientific name is just as telling. The genus Cnidoscolus is derived from the Greek cnid, meaning “nettle” and scolus, meaning “thorn.” The species epithet comes from the Latin stimul, meaning “to goad, prod or urge,” as in a “stimulus.”

Photo/Stacey Matrazzo

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Edible Native Walk at PEAR Park

Join the Florida Wildflower Foundation for an interactive edible plant walk at Lake County's PEAR Park on Saturday, March 5 from 10 a.m. until noon.

On this leisurely walk, we will taste, touch and smell some of the native plants growing in PEAR Park's native plant demonstration garden and learn which are edible, which have medicinal properties and which have cultural and historical importance.

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The Florida Wildflower Foundation is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization; contributions are tax deductible. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION FOR THE FLORIDA WILDFLOWER FOUNDATION, A FLORIDA-BASED NONPROFIT CORPORATION (REGISTRATION NO. CH12319), MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE 1-800-HELP-FLA (435-7352) WITHIN THE STATE OR VISITING THEIR WEBSITE HERE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE.